The Bates Student

The Voice of Bates College since 1873

Day: January 18, 2017 (Page 1 of 2)

Passengers: When will you succumb to loneliness?

Futuristic sci-fi is not the first genre I search for when going to the movie theater. However, every once in awhile there will be one film that catches my attention and truly impresses and entertains me. Perhaps it was Chris Pratt (whose movie characters always starkly contrast his iconic portrayal of Andy Dwyer in Parks and Recreation) and the ever versatile Jennifer Lawrence. Whatever the case, Passengers brilliantly highlighted Pratt’s and Lawrence’s acting talent while portraying a unique story.

Set years in the future, the human race has developed the technology to send waves of people aboard the spaceship Avalon to colonize a new world on the planet Homestead II. The catch? It takes 120 years to get there. All 5,000 passengers are placed in individual hibernation pods where they are kept alive but their physical development is halted, ultimately allowing them to wake up 120 years later in the same condition as the beginning of the voyage. When the Avalon is hit by a meteor shower, one hibernation pod is activated – Jim Preston’s (played by Pratt).

The worst part is that he has been awoken 90 years too soon.

With his only friend being an emotionless robotic bartender named Arthur, Preston must face the reality of his eternal loneliness. That is until fellow passenger Aurora Lane, played by Lawrence, is awoken just a couple years later.

As anticipated, the two fall madly in love and thoroughly enjoy their solitude on the Avalon. But alas, it is not long until the ship suffers malfunction after malfunction. It is up to the couple to take action and save themselves and all 4,998 sleeping passengers on board.

What impresses me most about the film is how just two characters can carry the plot without fail. Like I said, I am not usually attracted to sci-fi movies because I get bored of them pretty easily, so this was an extra-successful storyline in my opinion. It reminded me of how Cast Away managed to convey its plot so effortlessly with only a single character.

What Passengers and Cast Away have in common, besides their small casts, is the central theme of navigating loneliness. Loneliness is something we have all experienced yet strive to avoid. However, there is such distinction between being alone as an individual and being alone with another person. This movie made me question if we are ever truly alone. In Cast Away Tom Hanks’ character created Wilson out of an inanimate object while Preston and Lane in Passengers at least had each other. This added a layer of drama, love, lust, and overall a more complex expression of entertainment.

The whole time I was watching the movie, I kept imagining myself in their shoes, alone on a spaceship knowing that no one else would wake up for 90 years. Even though the movie was blatantly fictional, the concept of loneliness it projected was scarily realistic.

Futuristic sci-fi is not the first genre I search through when going to the movie theater. Honestly though, I am going to watch it again after writing this.

 

Today Will Be Different: A peak into someone else’s world

I like my books the same way I like my friends: genuine. When a book is relatable, humorous, and easy to read the prospect of curling up with it becomes all the more appealing. That is exactly what Maria Semple accomplishes in her novel Today Will Be Different. Broaching a myriad of topics from motherhood to sisterhood, careers, to life, Semple presents it all with grace and ease.

There are over 171,000 words in the English language and billions of ways to string them all together. Semple found a way to weave together her words in a nuanced and lyrical way. For example, Eleanor describes her consciousness as something that “lives underground like a toad in winter.” That extra bit of imagery paints a clearer picture and helps the reader understand the protagonist just a little bit more.

But it is not just the tone of her words that impacted me, but the way Semple presented them. Having a first person narrator allowed Semple to break the fourth wall and talk directly to her reader. This type of narrator also gives the protagonist more freedom in the sense that she, Eleanor Flood, was able to orient personally her listener in her life; almost as if she is colluding with you, letting you in on a secret that is for your eyes only.

Sometimes, if the book is really good I develop a connection with the characters. I root for them, chastise them for poor decisions, and yes, on rare occasions I even cry for them. Reading this novel I saw the world through Eleanor’s eyes, I saw her worries and her flaws, what made her tick and what ticked her off. Eleanor became a real, relatable person. Though she may be “a past-her-prime animator” married to a seemingly perfect hand surgeon husband with an adorable son, she has secrets that we as readers get to experience. We step inside her head and experience her life, if only for a day.

Creating an insightful, but not preachy, character is hard to do, but here I think Semple excels. Even though Eleanor is a fifty-year-old mother, she divulges factoids about herself that can relate to anyone (even a college student in the midst of applying for copious amounts of summer internships).

Eleanor states when she is nervous, “I talk fast. I jump topics unexpectedly. I say shocking things. Right before I push too far, I double back and expose a vulnerability.” This is candid statement that pulls no punches. Declarations like those make the book feel real, like you have a front row seat to her subconscious; the prose is not overly academic, instead it flows more like a conversation. It makes you think about Eleanor, but also about yourself.

Though the main timescale of the book takes place in one day, Semple jumps around in time, creating a nesting doll-like framework. The big doll is just one day in Eleanor’s life, but once you open up that doll, inside there are many smaller dolls and each is a different anecdote from Eleanor’s past that all fit together perfectly in the larger work of the story. Through these jumps, the reader gets to know Eleanor’s ethereal but disappointing sister Ivy, her alcoholic father, the story of how she met her husband, Joe and more.

But the core allure of this story is and always will be Eleanor. Between the pages of the novel, Eleanor’s melancholy life comes into focus. She had a hard childhood: a dead mother, a deadbeat father, and a relationship with her sister that started out strong but degraded over time. All those struggles caused Eleanor to become a bit calloused, but did not prevent her from finding her place in the world.

Most importantly, her life experiences helped her learn a very powerful secret, one that she shares with her eight-year-old son. “That’s the thing about hard times,’ [she] said. ‘Generally speaking, one survives.’” Though that statement is blunt, it communicates so much about the character Semple built. Eleanor is a pragmatist, but an optimistic one, she is a mother but one that does not sugar coat the world for her child. Above all else, she is a survivor who slogs through life even when she would rather stay in bed.

Do yourself a favor and read this book. It will not take you long, but it will stick with you long after you reach the end.

 

The art of sexting

Contemporary art museums are weird. You go past the reception and enter an unusual place where anything is possible. You see canvasses painted with one single tone of red and you see benches on which no one can sit. If you are lucky enough, you will also see a small metal can in which artists have stored their own excrement. For your surprise, no one seems to notice that there is a can full of literal sh*t inside a museum. You ponder and after a long consideration but you still have no idea what the hell you are doing looking at contemporary art. You are not alone.

This break I embarked on one of these adventures, but with one difference. This time around I challenged myself to not dismiss the absurd, the ugly, or the weird. I would carefully watch the one colored canvasses as I would with a renaissance painting. I would embrace it just long enough to feel a connection. The simple brick sculptures, the awkward deformed human shapes, and the stuff hanging from the ceiling…I would watch it closely. No text, no arts history, no fancy explanations.

That day I entered the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston to discover one of the most beautiful pices of art I have ever seen. Walking by the contemporary art section of the museum, I found myself in a small white room. The piece was called Osservate, leggete con me by Frances Stark. Inside the room, words were projected on three walls. There was classical music. To my surprise, the sentences projected on the walls seemed to be some sort of flirtatious texting. No canvasses, no paint – that was all. It was slightly obscene, oddly uncomfortable. I sat down on a bench placed in the middle of the room (I was confident it was “sittable”).

Of the two people talking, one of them was an artist, presumably the one that created this piece. The artist was talking to someone from Italy, followed by others. It was not only flirtation. Between teaching dirty words in Italian, they talked about the political situation in Italy and about the very meaning of artistic creation. It was so spontaneous, free of any pretension or worries. The quick summary about European politics was followed by sexting as if it was just a natural transition. I never truly considered how profound the daily life is. But there was more.

While watching that video for 30 minutes or so, I was constantly expecting grandiosity. The MFA is an awesome museum with an interesting curation and particularly good contemporary art section. I was constantly on the verge of epiphany, from discussing Tantra to the Medici family in Italy. At one point, the artist is asked “is art for you, art, or business.” This conversation would be so heavy, so serious, if it was not for the context. “Art.” The intensity peaks along with the music and suddenly, the discussion goes back to flirtation.

This is one of the hidden powers of a museum. Museums bring to the spotlight something that would have gone unnoticed. I expected to see art and I saw it even in the least pretensions, simplest contexts. You just need to give it time, observe it for long enough.

Apparently, sexting is sublime if you give it a chance.

 

Lost in Copenhagen: An adventure abroad

About a year ago, I got on a plane and flew to England. I spent my semester in a beautiful city called Bath, on a study abroad program called Advanced Studies in England. (NOTE: ASE is, objectively, the best abroad program ever – no exaggeration). I had the time of my life across the pond. It was not all tea and crumpets though, like the time I went to Denmark.

Now, do not get me wrong – I loved Denmark. I stayed in Copenhagen, which was absolutely beautiful. From the trampolines in the street, to the cat cafe that was so purrfect it made me cry tears of joy; to the vibrant and artsy neighborhood of Freetown Christiania, Copenhagen was full of delights. But we have to remember that this is me we are talking about, and I have a certain knack for being a mess. (At least now I can blame it on being a second-semester senior, right?)

Anyway, it was a Saturday night in April. I was out with my friend, whom I was also staying with at her host family’s house. It was getting pretty late, so we decided to head back to the metro station and catch our ride home. We were in a part of the city my friend hadn’t been to yet, though, so we ended up getting a little confused of our surroundings. Finally, we made it to the station. I looked around for a moment, checking out the architecture. When I turned back to my friend, she was gone. . .and then I spotted her, running at full speed toward a train, which she got on, turning back to shout to me. At this point, I was racing to catch up with her. My heart sank as the doors closed and the train pulled away. There I was, alone in a city I was not familiar with at all. The only Danish words I knew were “hello,” “goodbye,” and “thank you.”

Luckily, there were other college students from America at the station. They told me which train I should take, and hope that my friend was waiting at the first stop. To my relief, she was. While I was jumping for joy to be reunited, my friend wasn’t as happy. Turns out, the train she got on was the last one of the night that headed back to her host family’s house. And I had missed it. I still do not think this is my fault, because she ran off without telling me. It did not matter who was wrong at that point, though. We had bigger issues at hand, like how the hell were we supposed to get back?!

Without any public transport to assist us, my friend and I relied on the map app on her phone to tell us the direction to walk in. We headed off into the night, freaking out at each other about the situation. The map had led us onto the back roads of Copenhagen, which I bet are marvelous, but at the time seemed downright scary. We had no idea where we were. Despite the fact that Copenhagen’s crime rate is wicked low, I would panic for my safety every time a vehicle drove by. After what felt like hours of walking in the dark, we finally reached a neighborhood my friend recognized. We ran through it to get to her host family’s house, with me very narrowly missing stepping into a pile of dog crap. Finally, we were back inside. I slept for a few hours, then was up again to catch my flight back to Bath.

Ridiculous, whirlwind adventures like that pretty much sum up my study abroad experience. While it was hectic at times, I would do anything to relive that semester – even race through the pitch black, eerie back streets of a foreign city.

 

An alphabetical journey into the English Premier League: C

Chelsea (The Blues)

Overview: The team was founded in 1905 in Fulham, London and has enjoyed many successes including 5 national league titles, 7 FA Cups, 5 League Cups, 4 FA Community Shields, 1 UEFA Champions League, 1 EUFA Europa League, and 1 UEFA Super Cup.

Stadium: Stamford Bridge

Notable players:

Ron Harris, D (1962-1980)

Frank Lampard, MF (2001-2014)

Bobby Tambling, F (1959-1970)

Didier Drogba, F (2004-2012, 2014-2015)

Jimmy Greaves, F (1957-1961)

Petr Cech, GK (2004-2015)

Eden Hazard, MF (present)

John Terry, D (present)

Fun facts:

6th highest average all-time attendance in English football

7th most valuable club ($1.66 billion)

Known for their hooligan fans in the 1970’s and 1980’s

The team was bought for 1 euro in 1982

They were one of the first clubs to play with numbered shirts

They have the record for greatest point spread in Europe (21-0 over Jeunesse Hautcharage)

Crystal Palace (The Eagles)

Overview: The team was founded in 1905 in South Norwood, London at the famous Crystal Palace Exhibition. They have been FA Cup finalists twice and finished 3rd in the top English division in 1991, their highest ever finish.

Stadium: Selhurst Park

Notable players:

Jim Cannon, D (1973-1988)

Peter Simpson, F (1929-1935)

Yannick Bolasie, MF (2012-2016)

Christian Benteke, F (present)

Fun facts:

Only team in premier league history to be relegated after finishing 4th bottom

Relegated 4 times from the premier league (highest number of any team)

 

The melting “squash” pot

The Bates Squash team continues to be one of the better teams on campus and it is not because of our successful record. Rather, the integration of people from different backgrounds with a common goal. Former captains Lauren Williams’16 (Zimbabwe) and Caran Arora’16 (India) started a trend of bringing both the women and men squash teams together through social gatherings in order to unify our differences. From my perspective, they continue to be great leaders because although they acknowledge the squash team abilities, they also take into consideration that everyone has a story to be told; one must take time to listen, embrace, and act when a teammate needs support.

Kristyna Alexova’19 (Czech Republic) has the ability to pick and choose when she wants to run as the dominant player on court. Luca Polgar’20 (Hungary) plays with so much intensity and aggressiveness that her style of play leaves her opponents hopeless. Victoria Arjoon’s’19 (Guyana) precision, power, dedication, and effort make her a deadly player. Eliza Dunham’20 (CT) is a strategic player with the tenacity to always win, while displaying a level of sportsmanship that everyone should strive for. Capt. Emma “Momma” Dunn’17 (WA) has the ability to push anyone she plays with her level of fitness and knowledge of the game. Capt. Charlotte “DirtyChar” Cabot’17 (MA) is one of the smartest, fittest, and nicest players I have ever met. The “dynamic duo,” Katie Bull’19 (MA) and Molly Brooks’19 (VA) are having the best season because their opponents cannot figure out how to break them down. They are powerhouses! Blair Weintraub’18 (NY) puts lots of pressure on herself to be the best squash player she could be when she has proven that she is a great player through improving her game at a fast rate and working extremely hard on and off court. Nubia Beasley-Bartee’20 (IL) continues to improve her squash and fitness at a rate that I can only dream of. Kyla Rabb’17 (CT) has athletic abilities that allowed her to re-pick up the game of squash and compete at a collegiate level. Alyssa Rohan’20 (Switzerland) picked up squash as a PE credit and now strives for collegiate success with her determination and sense of calmness.

Besides from being a 3-time All-American, Ahmed Hatata’17 (Egypt) is truly a good person, which makes him a pleasure to be around. Due to injuries, Anirudah Nambiar’18 (India) has not played his best game of squash, but carries the burden of playing top of the ladder with fierceness because he never goes down without a fight and some cheesecake. On and off court Mahmoud Yousry’20 (Egypt) is a powerhouse, but listening to his philosophical views on life is even more impressive. Capt. Spencer Burt’17 (OR) definitely improved the most and is using his confidence, fitness, and determination to breakdown any opponent he plays. Graham Bonnell’20 (CT) is the smartest player on the court in my opinion and as a result his opponents are usually running aimlessly. Coley Cannon’19 (CT) thrives in a high intensity setting because he feeds off of the energy of the crowd and always has it in his heart to win. Garon Rothenberg’20 (NY) has not been 100% the entire season, but he continues to fight and put the team before his injuries and I respect his mentality and effort! Carlos Ames’17 (MA) comes back from a heel injury and still has the ability to compete with anyone he plays. The beep-test champion, McLeod Abbott’19 (NY), is always looking for ways to improve his game, which is a very specific game: run until your opponent cannot run anymore. Stefan Joseph’17 (British Virgin Island) brings the cool and relaxing island vibe to the court. Bernhardur Magnusson McComish’20 (MA) is the nicest player on and off the court and his potential for the future is literally at his discretion. The “silent assassin,” Creighton Foulkes’17 (MA), is hands down one of the hardest working athletes at Bates by far and I strive to have his work ethic. If someone could be the face of Bates squash, I would vote, David Quintero’20 (CA) simply because he is the highlight of most peoples’ days with his quirky sense of humor and squash style.

Squash is more than the “battle of the minds” and companionship, but rather the potential for productive conversations on differences. By bringing together a group of individuals with a common goal of squash success, this allows for each player to potentially hear another perspective on life. Productive conversations about racism, white privilege, and patriarchy occur within my team and although it’s uncomfortable, it’s a start to embrace diversity and inclusivity. Diversity does not promise a happy ending to your college experience, but rather enhances your education in a worldly sense. The Bates Squash team is by no means perfect, but the level of diversity that we have shows that there is potential to always learn about the lives of each other. The question is, are you willing to listen, embrace, and act when needed?

 

Purposeful Debate

Rather than aggressively complain about our current political events, this week I decided to ask for insight, advice, and tips from Zoë Seaman-Grant and Matthew Davis. The two debate team members recently competed in the World Universities Debating Championship, reaching the final round. Regarding the competition, they agreed that they struggled the most with was defending South Korea pursuing nuclear weapons. Davis explained, “The debate developed in a way that we weren’t expecting and I think both of us had trouble figuring out where we wanted it to go next,” and Seaman-Grant added: “We felt somewhat confident going into the debate, but then the debate got away from us and the arguments we planned on making did not go over as well as we expected.” Challenges like these did not stop Seaman-Grant and Davis from excelling in the international competition, which in part can be attributed to the intensity of their preparation, which sounds as taxing as taking an extra course at Bates. Seaman Grant noted, “During the months leading up to Worlds, Matt and I did practice debates together at least 3 times a week.”

In terms of research preparation, the two agreed that keeping up with current events were necessary, especially from sources or opinions they did not agree with in order to understand the other side. Davis recalls, “I also try to look out for viewpoints that are contrary or counterintuitive to my own because those are often the hardest to defend if you get assigned to that side in a debate.” These strategies around teamwork and research can be applied to the way social conversations go within and beyond classrooms at Bates. In terms of maintaining healthy and productive discourse, the two competitors offered the following advice:

“One of the most important things is to share a premise or goal. A debate that frequently comes up is the role of the United States in East Asia, and when both sides share the premise of wanting peace and security for all involved it can be a nuanced and productive discussion about how US presence affects those things. If one side wants a war with China, it not only becomes a very different debate, but it is impossible to have the debate about whether or not US presence is “good” because both sides have competing definitions of what “good” means. Of course sometimes you need to have those debates, but within discourse around policy not sharing a premise or goal with your opposition usually devolves the conversation into a shouting match rather than a debate.” -Matthew Davis, ’18

“Something that I really love about debate is that it encourages people to think about arguments that they wouldn’t normally believe. In debate, you are assigned a topic, which means you sometimes need to defend things you don’t necessarily agree with. Because of this, you start to develop empathy for people who disagree with you in everyday life because you have experience thinking about arguments that you’re normally not exposed to. I think the most important thing is to understand that the person you’re talking to is a person with thoughts and feelings and emotions just like you, even if they’re defending something you strongly disagree with.” -Zoe Seaman-Grant, ’17

In terms of intervention and social activism, the two agreed that trying to understand the other person’s perspective– rather than say, trying to win– is the most effective strategy. Moreover, speaking up against things you don’t believe in is extremely important while remembering to make it productive. Grant notes the confidence the debate team has given, “I used to sit back and just quietly be angry when people made arguments I strongly disagreed with. Now, I feel like I have an obligation to speak up on behalf of people who are made uncomfortable by those arguments and debate has taught me how to speak up in a productive and empowered way.”

In light of MLK day and the upcoming inauguration, I hope we can keep these strategies, tips, and insight in mind in our interactions with those we may not agree with.

 

The art of sexting

Contemporary art museums are weird. You go past the reception and enter an unusual place where anything is possible. You see canvasses painted with one single tone of red and you see benches on which no one can sit. If you are lucky enough, you will also see a small metal can in which artists have stored their own excrement. For your surprise, no one seems to notice that there is a can full of literal sh*t inside a museum. You ponder and after a long consideration but you still have no idea what the hell you are doing looking at contemporary art. You are not alone.

This break I embarked on one of these adventures, but with one difference. This time around I challenged myself to not dismiss the absurd, the ugly, or the weird. I would carefully watch the one colored canvasses as I would with a renaissance painting. I would embrace it just long enough to feel a connection. The simple brick sculptures, the awkward deformed human shapes, and the stuff hanging from the ceiling…I would watch it closely. No text, no arts history, no fancy explanations.

That day I entered the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston to discover one of the most beautiful pieces of art I have ever seen. Walking by the contemporary art section of the museum, I found myself in a small white room. The piece was called Osservate, leggete con me by Frances Stark. Inside the room, words were projected on three walls. There was classical music. To my surprise, the sentences projected on the walls seemed to be some sort of flirtatious texting. No canvasses, no paint – that was all. It was slightly obscene, oddly uncomfortable. I sat down on a bench placed in the middle of the room (I was confident it was “sittable”).

Of the two people talking, one of them was an artist, presumably the one that created this piece. The artist was talking to someone from Italy, followed by others. It was not only flirtation. Between teaching dirty words in Italian, they talked about the political situation in Italy and about the very meaning of artistic creation. It was so spontaneous, free of any pretension or worries. The quick summary about European politics was followed by sexting as if it was just a natural transition. I never truly considered how profound the daily life is. But there was more.

While watching that video for 30 minutes or so, I was constantly expecting grandiosity. The MFA is an awesome museum with an interesting curation and particularly good contemporary art section. I was constantly on the verge of epiphany, from discussing Tantra to the Medici family in Italy. At one point, the artist is asked “is art for you, art, or business.” This conversation would be so heavy, so serious, if it was not for the context. “Art.” The intensity peaks along with the music and suddenly, the discussion goes back to flirtation.

This is one of the hidden powers of a museum. Museums bring to the spotlight something that would have gone unnoticed. I expected to see art and I saw it even in the least pretensions, simplest contexts. You just need to give it time, observe it for long enough.

Apparently, sexting is sublime if you give it a chance.

 

Bates commemorates MLK Jr. Day

On Monday the 16th, Bates cancelled all classes in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day and offered students multiple workshops, talks, and performances with the theme “Reparations.” The activities began with a discussion entitled “Reparations 101” and a Keynote speaker, Khalil Gibran Muhammad who is an educator and author of “The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America.”

There were multiple workshops offered during the day with different and diverse topics; one such workshop was entitled “Addressing the Earliest Educational Injustices: How Unconscious Bias Feeds the Preschool-to-Prison Pipeline” and was led by Christopher Northrop, Clinical Professor at the University of Maine School of Law; Caroline Wilshusen, Associate Dean for Admissions at the law school; and De’Anna Mills, Juris Doctor candidate at the law school. The focus of this particular talk was on explicit and implicit bias in schools across the country. There were multiple videos shown of educators in elementary, middle, and high school settings using racial slurs when speaking to African-Americans and mentally and physically abusing them.

At the second part of the workshop, videos of school resource officers—police officers who work in schools to enforce certain behavior—were shown. There was an instance where a police handcuffed an African-American boy with ADHD; however, handcuffs are not to be used on small children. In another instance the police officer used physical force on three middle school girls. The videos were followed by questions and comments from the audience who shared their personal stories in the United States schooling system, thus normalizing the actions of the teachers and police officers because they themselves have experienced it.

The majority of workshops were led by educators and professionals outside of the Bates community, thus giving the students more insight about systemic racism. The debate regarding the “Motion: This house believes the state should exclusively focus on rectifying current inequalities to the exclusion of compensating for historical injustices,” was led by students Tessa Holtzman ’17 and Zoe Seaman-Grant ’17 who argued for and against reparations to the African-American community. With interesting insights and point, it was clear that each side had done extensive research. A point was made that reparations would not solve anything, for the African-American community would not invest in their own community. It was argued that the government should start programs and fund education, retrain their police officers, and reform the prisons. An opposing point was made that the government has failed with programming in the past and that the African-American community knows what is best for them.

The events concluded with a Hip-Hop Dance Workshop, which focused on the culture and movement of hip-hop dance and performance of Sankofa presents Testimonies of Melanin Magic.

 

New year, old ways for the Bates Men’s Basketball Team

Bates started off their winter break schedule on the right foot with a 68-58 win over Saint Joseph’s College of Maine. Marcus Delpeche ‘17 led the team with 15 points and added three blocked shots to his stat line. His twin brother, Malcolm Delpeche ‘17, and guard Quin Leary ‘17 each put up 11 points. The Bobcats had one of their best shooting performances from beyond the arc, shooting 44%. They also had a season low in turnovers with just six.

The Bobcats continued their good play at the NYU’s Men’s Basketball Classic in New York City. They went undefeated in the two-day tournament, taking down Farmingdale State and Framingham State, respectively. The first game took place Dec. 29th. Marcus dominated, tallying 27 points and 17 rebounds, and brother Malcolm followed with a near double-double of 14 points and nine rebounds. Fellow senior Jerome Darling ‘17 gave the team a boost with his 15 points and a career high eight assists. The Bobcats finished with the most points in a half (60) since 2015 and the most points in a game (111) since 2013. They also broke a tournament record for most points in a game.

The next day, the Bobcats finished the tournament undefeated with a great defensive performance against Framingham State, winning 69-40. The Delpeche twins continued to have the juice, with Malcolm dropping a career-high 23 points to go along with 11 rebounds and five blocks, while Marcus added a double-double to the mix. The Bobcats never trailed during the game and held their opponents to 32% shooting and 40 points allowed — the lowest Bates has held an opponent to since a 2012 win over University of New England. Both of the twins earned an “all-classic” spot at the tournament due to their outstanding play.

Bates kept the hot streak going in the new year with a win at Brandeis 73-66 on January 3. Darling put up a career-high 20 points to lead the team and added four assists. The game was a tight one, with nine different lead changes. The Bobcats did not pull away until around 15 minutes left in the second half. The first years stepped up this game as Jeff Spellman ‘20 and Nick Gilpin ‘20 tallied 13 and six points, respectively. This was a big win for the ‘cats before going into NESCAC play against rival Colby on January on 6th.

In their conference opener, The Bobcats were able to exact revenge after their non-conference loss to Colby back on December 10. Malcolm led the team with 15 points, 12 rebounds, four blocked shots, and three assists. Everybody was firing on all cylinders, from Darling’s game-high 16 points to Justin Zukowski’s ‘18 11 points from off the bench, the Bobcats shot 48.4% from the field. They never trailed, and when Colby cut the deficit to seven points twice in the second half, the Bobcats pulled away again. Big shots from Max Eaton ‘17 and Darling sealed the deal and gave the Bobcats their first NESCAC win.

The hot hand was still sizzling on January 7 when Bates travelled to Bowdoin to beat them 64-59 to give the Bobcats their first 2-0 start in the NESCAC since 2006. Led by first year Tom Coyne ‘20, who scored a career-high 23 points, the Bobcats got a statement win over the Polar Bears. This game was intense from tip-off with 11 ties and eight lead changes, and had a score of 31-30 in favor of Bates at the half. The Bobcats went on a quick 5-0 run to start the second half. Bowdoin responded with an 8-2 run, tying things up at 38 on a Tim Ahn three-pointer with 16:09 to go in the game. Bowdoin then took the lead with a go-ahead Ahn three and went up 43-40 with the help of a Jack Simonds jumper with 13:58 left. Malcolm threw down a slam dunk to cut the deficit to one, but Bowdoin responded with an 8-0 run, giving them their largest lead of the game at 51-42. That is when Coyne took the game into his own hands. He went on a personal 9-0 run to solidify the Bobcat’s win. This win at Brunswick was the first one since 2011 and put their record at 11-3. The last time they were 11-3 they went on to their first NCAA tournament appearance in the 2014-2015 season.

The Bobcats then moved to 3-0 in NESCAC play with a win over Hamilton on January 13. The Delpeche twins continued their dual dominance, both putting up double-doubles. Spellman would provide plenty of support off the bench with his 16 points to give the team an 83-78 victory at home in front of a large crowd at Alumni Gymnasium.

The seven game win streak would end this Saturday, as 15th ranked Middlebury came into Alumni and handed Bates a 79-71 loss. Middlebury dominated the glass, out rebounding the Bobcats 45-31, leading to 21 second chance points for the Panthers whereas Bates only grabbed seven second chance points. The Panther’s Jake Brown led all scorers with 24 points. Spellman would continue his personal hot streak with a team-high 14 points off the bench and Malcolm added 12 points and seven rebounds. The Bobcats never led in the game and got as close as 11 points with 11:35 left but the Panthers refused to let up and put the game away right after.

With a 3-1 conference mark so far this season, tied for second place in the NESCAC, the Bobcats will look for a quick turnaround, as two more NESCAC matchups with Connecticut College and Wesleyan will be played at home this weekend.

 

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