The Bates Student

The Voice of Bates College since 1873

Author: James Karsten (Page 1 of 7)

An alphabetical journey into the English Premier League: W

West Bromwich Albion F.C. (The Baggies)

Overview: West Brom was founded in 1878 as the West Bromwich Strollers in West Bromwich in the West Midlands. They were one of the founding members of the Football League in 1888 and have spent most of their time in the top tier division. They won the league in 1920 and were runners up twice. They have won the FA Cup five times (the most recent in 1968). West Brom enjoyed initial success until the 1960’s to 1990’s when they struggled with relegations and poor management. In 2002 they were promoted to the Premier League, were relegated the next year, and then promoted again. This pattern has been repeated over the early 2000’s. Their major rivals are Aston Villa and Wolverhampton Wanderers.

Stadium: The Hawthorns (26,852)

Notable players:

Jesse Pennington, D (1903-1922)

Will Richardson, F (1929-1945)

Tony Brown, F (1963-1980)

Bryan Robson, M (1972-1981)

Fun Facts:

– They are the only team to win the FA cup and win promotion into the top league in the same year

– One of the earliest teams to have black players (in the 70’s!)

– First Premier League team to avoid relegation after being dead last at Christmas

Their fans are notable for their intelligence, scoring highly on a national intelligence test

West Ham United (The Hammers)

Overview: West Ham was founded in 1895 as Thames Ironworks before reforming in 1900 as West Ham United. The team is based in Stratford, East London, England. They competed in the Southern and Western League before joining the Football League in 1919. They have spent 59 of their 91 league seasons in the top flight of football. West Ham has won the FA Cup three times (1964, 1975, and 1980) and the European Cup Winners’ Cup in 1965. The 1960’s are considered to be the team’s glory years. They placed 7th in the Premier League in 2016 and signed their most expensive player, Andre Ayew ($20.5 million) for the current season.

Stadium: London Stadium (60,000)

Notable players:

Billy Bonds, M (1967-1988)

Geoff Hurst, F (1959-1972)

Trevor Booking, M (1966-1984)

Bobby Moore, D (1958-1974)

Fun Facts:

– Finalists in the first ever FA Cup held at Wembley Stadium

– One of eight teams to never fall below the 2nd tier of English Football

– Sold Frank Lampard to Chelsea for $1 million in 2001

– Signed Carlos Tevez and Javier Mascherano illegally in 2006

– Their fans sing about blowing bubbles

 

Women’s lacrosse fall to Hamilton away, 13-5

The women’s lacrosse team have their sights set on getting what they received last year: a bid to the NCAA tournament. With five regular season conference matchups remaining, their window of attaining that goal is slowly closing.

The women’s lacrosse team moved to 6-4 overall and 1-4 in the NESCAC last weekend, as they fell 13-5 in their game away verse Hamilton. Allison Dewey ‘18 and Camille Belletete ‘18 each scored a pair of goals for the Bobcats in the loss. Their trying contest against the second place Continentals (6-3, 4-1), came after a string of three consecutive victories. The Bobcats handled Saint Joseph’s 17-4 on March 20, an overtime victory — their third overtime contest of the season — against Williams 8-7 on March 25, and thumped Southern Maine 16-6 on March 28.

The Saint Joseph’s victory was highlighted by a trio of Bobcats, Melanie Mait ‘18 Sydney Cowles ‘17, and Avery MacMullen ‘20, each netting a hat trick. Dewey was the hero against the Ephs last weekend, scoring the game-winner in overtime to notch the Bobcat’s first conference victory of the season. The resounding victory over Southern Maine last week featured another three players recording hat tricks: Katie Allard ‘19, Belletete, and Dewey. Belletete leads the team in scoring thus far, having recorded 23 goals in 10 contests. The team has done a great job of creating opportunities — 89 through five conference games — but have struggled to convert them into goals, shooting at just a 29.7% clip in conference matchups.

The women host Bowdoin on Wednesday in what proves to be a tough NESCAC matchup; Bowdoin is undefeated out of conference and currently sits tied for fourth in conference with a 3-2 record. The game will take place on Garcelon field at 7:00pm.

 

Women’s lacrosse fall to Hamilton away, 13-5

The women’s lacrosse team have their sights set on getting what they received last year: a bid to the NCAA tournament. With five regular season conference matchups remaining, their window of attaining that goal is slowly closing.

The women’s lacrosse team moved to 6-4 overall and 1-4 in the NESCAC last weekend, as they fell 13-5 in their game away verse Hamilton. Allison Dewey ‘18 and Camille Belletete ‘18 each scored a pair of goals for the Bobcats in the loss. Their trying contest against the second place Alex (6-3, 4-1), came after a string of three consecutive victories. The Bobcats handled Saint Joseph’s 17-4 on March 20, eked out an overtime victory — their third overtime contest of the season — against Williams 8-7 on March 25, and thumped Southern Maine 16-6 on March 28.

The Saint Joseph’s victory was highlighted by a trio of Bobcats, Melanie Mait ‘18 Sydney Cowles ‘17, and Avery MacMullen ‘20, each netting a hat trick. Dewey was the hero against the Ephs last weekend, scoring the game-winner in overtime to notch the Bobcat’s first conference victory of the season. The resounding victory over Southern Maine last week featured another three players recording hat tricks: Katie Allard ‘19, Belletete, and Dewey. Belletete leads the team in scoring thus far, having recorded 23 goals in 10 contests. The team has done a great job of creating opportunities — 89 through five conference games — but have struggled to convert them into goals, shooting at just a 29.7% clip in conference matchups.

The women host Bowdoin on Wednesday in what proves to be a tough NESCAC matchup; Bowdoin is undefeated out of conference and currently sits tied for fourth in conference with a 3-2 record. The game will take place on Garcelon field at 7:00pm.

 

Baseball team resumes play after month long break

March can be a dreary time in Maine. For the Bates baseball team, the doldrums of March have been particularly sullen, as the team as struggled to play their scheduled games. Last weekend, storm Stella resulted in the cancellation of three games. Fortunately, the team’s run of four weeks without game action (since their trip to southern California over February break) ended this past weekend, as the Bobcat boys of summer split a classic doubleheader at Salem State Saturday, and thumped Endicott 10-4 on Sunday.

Steve Leavitt spun a gem for the Vikings in the shortened, seven inning game 1 of the doubleheader in Salem, MA. He tossed seven innings of five hit ball, striking out six Bobcats and walking just one. He gave up an RBI sacrifice fly to Brendan Fox ‘17 in the first inning, which brought home Ryan McCarthy ‘17 who reached on an error to begin the game. But Salem State would respond with four runs in the bottom half of the opening frame thanks to three errors from Bates. The score wouldn’t change for the rest of the game.

Game two featured another low scoring affair, as pitchers Stephen Keskindis of the Vikings and Connor Russell ‘19 for the Bobcats matched zeros through five innings. Russell was pulled in the sixth for Alex Simon ‘19, who recorded one out before closer Matt Doyle ‘17 came on for the remaining five outs. Keskindis started the seventh, but did not record an out as the heart of the Bobcat order reached base via two free passes and a hit by pitch. A wild pitch, sac fly, and an RBI single from shortstop Asher MacDonald ‘18 would give Doyle enough of a lead to secure the save and finish the split. This 3-0 win marked Bates’ first victory since February 22, when they defeated Cal Tech.

Sunday featured a single nine inning game against Endicott in Beverly MA, where Bates jumped out to a 9-0 lead, and didn’t look back as they cruised to a 10-4 victory. Designated hitter Eric Vilanova ‘17 launched a bases clearing double in Bates’ four run second inning, on his way to an impressive four RBI day in the fifth spot of coach Jon Martin’s lineup. Third basemen Kyle Carter ‘20 recorded three hits and an RBI in the victory. Anthony Telesca ‘17 was serviceable on the bump for the Bobcats, pitching five innings and yielding just two earned runs on seven hits in 74 pitches. A cohort of Bates’ relievers each recorded an inning of work to close out the victory.

With their weekend showing, the baseball team moved to 4-4 on the season. The Cats are slated to take on Colby in a three game series this weekend to kickoff NESCAC play, barring inclement weather. Here’s to a warm front and turf diamonds!

 

News and notes from Bates Athletics

Cancellations

The baseball team, anticipating their first game action in New-England, had their scheduled doubleheaders against Brandeis and Husson postponed, due to Storm Stella last week. The men’s lacrosse team also had a home contest against Endicott last Tuesday which was cancelled. There are no rescheduled dates at this point for any of those contests. The lacrosse schedule has moved steadily forward, but the storm proved untimely for the baseball team, who have not played a game since their trip to California over February break.

Lacrosse

The women’s lacrosse team split their games last week, thumping Wheaton 18-7, and competing on a snow-cleared Garcelon field Saturday when they fell to Trinity 9-5. Camille Belletete ‘18 tallied six goals over the course of both contests. The women’s team is 3-3 overall and 0-3 in the NESCAC. Meanwhile, the men’s team was victorious away against Trinity, moving to 5-0 overall and 3-0 in conference and continue to sit atop the NESCAC standings. Matt Chlastawa ‘20 led the attack with four goals. In the first USILA national DIII poll of the season that came out last week, Bates ranked eighth in the country.

Tennis

The women’s tennis team travelled to Fredericksburg, VA to compete in the Blue-Grey Invitational at University of Mary Washington last weekend. They competed against Whitman, Johns Hopkins, and Mary Washington, falling in all three matches by scores of 6-3, 7-2, and 8-1 respectively. Men’s tennis did not compete last weekend, but will travel to UMW in Fredericksburg on Friday to compete in the men’s blue-grey invitational.

 

Swimmers complete historic season with impressive performance

The men’s and women’s swim and dive season extends the farthest into the spring of any winter sport. Over the last weekend their drawn out postseason finally came to an end, culminating in the NCAA DIII swim and dive national championships in Shenandoah, TX. Only a small cadre of swimmers, those who qualified for the regional and national meets, trained during the three weeks between the NESCAC meet and nationals.

“We… trained them very hard for 2 full weeks after the (NESCAC) meet to make sure they could handle the rigors of a 4 day championship meet,” said head coach Peter Cesares in an email. “After those two weeks of intense training to build up their aerobic capacity were over we rested them by doing a lot of pace work to get them comfortable with their racing speed – and the fast swimming that was coming.” Cesares is not unfamiliar with national meet preparation, who is in his 10th season at the helm of the Bates aquatics program, and a collegiate All-American swimmer himself.

“We do a ton of easy swimming, mixed in with some pace work,” added Sara Daher ‘17 in an email, one of Bates’ swimmers who competed in an array of events last weekend. “It helps us remind our body of what it feels like to race fast. The easy swimming ensures our body is recovering properly before, in between, and after races.” This mix and match approach, put together by Cesares would prove effective in Texas.

One hurdle the teams had to overcome before they even started swimming was their long, mid-semester trip to the far south. “The distance can be a bit tough to juggle, as traveling isn’t the best for your body on the way to a swim meet,” Daher noted of the farthest distance the team had to travel this season. Arriving in Texas on Monday, two days prior to its start, gave the Bates swimmers an extra day to acclimate, recover from their travel, and prep for the meet.

After finishing fifth in the NESCAC meet, tying the best finish in program history for the third year in a row, the men’s team finished 24th out of 52 teams at the national meet, another program best finish, per the Bates Office of Sports Information. Teddy Pender ‘18 led the men, finishing 11th in the 100 freestyle with a time of 44.72, a new team record.

The women’s team finished in 13th place out of 51 teams, and were anchored by another stellar performance from Daher. Daher, who had already collected 17 All-American honors over the course of her collegiate swimming career, added six more to her record. For swimmers, these awards are distributed based on each individual event, giving swimmers like Daher, who are able-bodied in a broad array of events, the opportunity to tally such a high number of honors.

With 23, Daher is unquestionably the most decorated Bates swimmer in school history, more than doubling the number of awards any other swimmer has received, according to the swim and dive team website. Her final collegiate performance will almost certainly vault her into consideration as one of Bates’ top athletes of all-time. “It’s an extremely surreal feeling walking away from my last collegiate meet as a Bobcat,” Daher said. “I would not be where I am today without my teammates, coaches, family and friends. It is quite an honor to represent Bates College and the swim program at the most elite meet in all of Division III.”

“The team overall swam great. They handled adversity – both tough swims that hurt and missed opportunities – and bounced back to swim lifetime bests and score points at the toughest meet of the year,” said Cesares of his team’s performance. “They had huge successes along the way and learned so much about what it takes to compete at the highest level.”

 

News and notes from Bates Athletics

Indoor Track

The indoor track and field team sent a cadre of athletes to the NCAA championships in Naperville, IL last weekend. The women’s team returned with an impressive collection of accolades. A top eight finish at nationals garners your All-American status, of which the women’s team had four over the course of the meet. Sally Ceesay ‘18 finished seventh in the triple-jump, Allison Hill ‘17 finished fifth in the 200-meter dash, and Jessica Wilson ‘17 anchored the distance medley relay on their way to a fourth place finished, and completed a successful quick turnaround by finishing fifth in the 3,000-meter race, rounding out Bates All-American finishes. These impressive performances propelled the team to an 11th place overall finish, the best indoor finish at the national meet since 2006, per the Bates office of sports information. The men’s team’s distance medley relay runners placed 10th in the meet, just outside the All-American window. Adedire Fakorede ‘18, the fifth and final member of the men’s team to compete in Naperville, finished in fourth place in the weight-throw. Fakorede earned All-American status for the second year in a row.

Alpine and Nordic Skiing

Kelsey Chenoweth ‘17 finished 20th in both the slalom and giant slalom races at the NCAA championships last weekend in Jackson, NH. Michael Cooper ‘19 placed 29th and 26th in the slalom and giant slalom races respectively. In the Nordic competitions, Sadie James ‘17, Bates’ lone Nordic skier at nationals, finished 32nd in the women’s 5K classic race, and 36th in the 15K freestyle event.

Men’s Lacrosse

The men’s lacrosse team moved to 4-0 on the season, and 2-0 in the NESCAC, with a 23-17 victory over Amherst on Sunday afternoon. In their second game delayed by cold weather, Peter Lasagna’s men put on an offensive clinic, recording the most goals in a NESCAC competition in program history, per the Bates office of sports information. Kyle Weber ‘17 tallied a hat trick of hat tricks, netting nine goals. Mitchell Drake ‘18 recorded 20 saves in goal.

Softball

The softball team matched their 2016 season win total in their first weekend of competition this year. Maddie Inlow ‘17 led the Bobcats to an impressive 5-3 mark on their trip to Florida. Inlow went eight for 21 during the trip, tallying eight RBI’s and three home runs. The softball team plays Southern Maine Wednesday in their home opener.

 

Class of ‘17: A case study in athlete roster retention at Bates

Part 1 – The tribulations and triumphs of collegiate athletics

Fall semester at Bates College is just getting into full swing. Olivia glances around at the foliage as she walks to the Davis fitness center. A forward on the basketball team, Olivia has a mandatory weight lifting session twice a week. She is hoping her hard work will correspond to more playing time this season. Olivia hits the weights and then grabs lunch in Commons with some of her teammates.

After her 2:40 class, Olivia finishes her calculus problem set and then gets ready for pickup at 7:00 with the rest of the team. Olivia has been playing basketball ever since she could walk, and genuinely loves the game. She can’t imagine what she would do without the sport in her life, but occasionally she feels all the time she puts in is a waste. It’s still the offseason, and she’s already beginning to feel a little burnt out. During the season, this schedule will get even more rigorous. Upwards of three hours a day will be spent on the court, not to mention travel and additional commitments. This will be especially hard to get through if she doesn’t get a lot of playing time again this year.

Olivia now lays in her dorm room at midnight. She flips through her snapchat stories. A five second video pans a room full of her friends playing poker. The next story is a shows a packed Olin hall as a talk is given. Olivia laments the fact that she doesn’t have a lot of time to improve her computer coding skills, something she is passionate about. She runs her hands acros her basketball, just before she falls asleep.

This hypothetical scenario depicts a dilemma that many Bates athletes face. Although they love and are committed to their sports, it’s easy for athletes to start thinking about all of the other activities they are missing out on while spending time in the gym or on the field. This crisis often informs athletes making the tough decision to stop playing the sports they love.

“After going abroad a lot of my priorities changed and being abroad and away from Bates made me rethink what makes me happy, what is important to me, and want I wanted to accomplish my last year at Bates.” wrote Gabby O’leary ‘17 in an email to The Student. O’leary competed on the volleyball team for three years, before deciding to stop playing this past fall. “When I came back, I made the very tough decision to stop playing volleyball and focus on writing my two theses, community work, and trying new things at Bates.”

An anonymous athlete who also stopped playing their sport expressed similar feelings, “When the season picked up, I couldn’t go to VCS, couldn’t go to Pause, couldn’t hang with other friends as much on weeknights and weekends. I was sleep deprived because most of my time was filled with an activity I didn’t find particularly fulfilling. This led to my consistently feeling down,” they said in an interview.

College is about balance. Sleep, academic pursuits, exercise, extracurricular activities, social events; they are all jam-packed into the supposedly greatest four years of one’s life. There are only 24 hours in a day, which means that students must pick and choose between activities. Having to make priorities sometimes can make an athlete realize they do not value their sport as much as spending time with friends, learning new skills, or engaging more with their academics and extracurriculars. This is especially true with the plethora of opportunities at a residential liberal arts college like Bates.

Lacrosse coach Peter Lasagna, echoed this statement in an email to The Student: “I have never and will never talk any student out of quitting. Life is too short. College is too short to spend one minute working hard on something that you’ve lost love for,” He wrote. “If there are pursuits out there that motivate you more, are more meaningful to your present and future than going to practice, lifting, watching film, sacrificing all that one has to sacrifice to play, be honest with yourself and make a hard decision.”

Lasagna’s supportive sentiment aside, coaches are still looking for players in the recruiting process who are willing to commit four years to their team. But this can be challenging because of a unique aspect of DIII and NESCAC athletics; there are no scholarships awarded to student-athletes. These atheletes play only for the love of the game, and not because of a binding financial agreement. This makes it hard for coaches to guarantee that players will play all four years, but offers athletes flexibility and agency to do what they want during their college experience.

“You are supposed to be in this because of the experience, because of the enjoyment. it’s supposed to be able to complement what you are doing academically, and reinforce that.” Athletic director Kevin McHugh, who is retiring at the end of this academic year, said in an interview. “And at some point if you are just not getting that, at least you are not throwing away a scholarship.”

The NESCAC has unique rules governing athletics to try to compensate for the fact that the member institutions feature rigorous academics. The NESCAC mission statement is rife with references to the primacy of academic rigor and excellence at member institutions. The resultant stipulations for NESCAC schools include shorter seasons, limited time coaches can spend with athletes, and emphasis on in-season competition.

This theoretically makes it easier for Bates athletes to balance athletics and the rest of their priorities. Regardless, there is no question that it is hard work being an athlete at Bates. It takes discipline, time management skills, hunger, as well as unwavering support from friends and family. Darrius Campbell ‘17, a squash player who has played all four years wrote in an email, “I think the biggest reason why I completed (four) years of squash (at) Bates was simply because my friends and family back home told me to never give up.”

Part 2 – Student-athlete retention in the class of 2017: a case study

McHugh shared with The Student in an interview that Bates’ athletic department does not keep hard data on athlete retention. He indicated that retention is considered holistically by the athletic department in their evaluation process for head coaches, a subject The Student reported on last year.

“We haven’t had that discussion,” McHugh said. “For me it would be a red flag, if we were losing upperclassmen in large numbers relative to how many they carry on the team, and there was unhappiness reflected in the evaluations and also reflected in how well we were able to compete.” McHugh’s comment highlights a tension for liberal arts schools like Bates; trying to establish competitive athletic teams while also ultimately being interested in the well-being of a student-athlete’s experience, regardless of whether they complete four years of varsity athletics. Low retention is then often identified in the criteria for evaluating coaches as a symptom of other problems a student or team might be facing, not a problem in itself.

“There is not a hard and fast (criteria), but I think it is written into the expectation that the experience that is being provided is a positive experience that kids will want to be a part of,” McHugh said.

The Student collected data from Bates’ athletics website for student-athletes in the class of ‘17, over the course of their four years at Bates. The website includes roster information for each team during that period. Here are some important nuggets from the case study:

– Of Bates’ 709 student-athletes on 2016-17 rosters, 145 are from the class of ‘17, or 20 percent of all current Bates student-athletes.

– On 2013-14 rosters, the class of ‘17’s first year at Bates, there were 215 student-athletes, compared to 145 this year, a 67 percent retention rate from first year rosters to senior year rosters.

– Of Bates’ 29 varsity teams, eight demonstrated perfect retention rates for the class of ‘17: Women’s Alpine Skiing, Women’s Basketball, Women’s Cross-Country, Women’s Golf, Baseball, Women’s Lacrosse, Men’s Lacrosse, and Women’s Squash.

– Of those eight teams, only one, Men’s Lacrosse, had double-digit athletes (13) in the class of ‘17.

– Only two teams demonstrated a retention rate of zero percent for athletes in the class of ‘17: Men’s Alpine Skiing and Field Hockey.

Part 3 – Implications

When it comes to individual circumstances, there are certainly advantages and disadvantages that come from quitting a sport. Not playing a varsity sport gives athletes more time to branch out socially, intellectually, and emotionally. The anonymous athlete who quit their sport reported improved mental health after their decision, more time to focus on academic work, and has become more politically oriented. On the other hand, they have found it tough to watch games from the sideline, and miss being competitive. With all this extra time, procrastination has been a challenge.

On a team wide scale, there are also consequences. Low retention can compound the work a coach must do for their team to be successful. Without a strong cohort of upper-class leaders, a coach might struggle with team chemistry and leadership. A steady stream of athletes failing to compete for a full four years will require a coach to bump up the amount of recruiting they need to do to field a team. “When you are recruiting someone who is in 12th grade coming in as a first year, your expectation is that they are going to be with you for four years because you don’t want to put in all the time and energy into somebody that is only going to be around for a year,” noted McHugh.

There are a few further investigations and questions that we have. First, it would be interesting to test how certain factors determine retention rates on teams. Win percentage, size of team, and season would be interesting variables to control for. Secondly, it is unclear if the 67 percent rate we found for the class of 2017 is high or low for DIII or NESCAC athletics. It would be interesting to do a comparison of Bates’s retention rate from class year to class year, and to other NESCAC schools. This would help contextualize the 2017 class case study that we have collected. At this point it is unclear whether there is a happy medium for a desirable retention rate; the important thing appears to simply be that Bates students are fulfilled by their collegiate endeavors.

 

An alphabetical journey into the English Premier League: S

Southampton F.C. (The Saints)

Overview: Southampton Football Club is based in Southampton, Hampshire, England in 1885. They are called The Saints because they were founded as the church football team at St. Mary’s Church of England. They changed their name to Southampton F.C. in 1896 after winning the Southern League. In 1992, Southampton were one of the founding members of the Premier League but struggled against relegation for their first ten years before being relegated in 2005. It took them 7 years, and some financing woes to make it back to the Premier League. In 2015, they placed 7th in the Premier League, their highest ever rank. They have won the FA Cup once in 1976 and placed second in the First Division in 1984. The team is known for its successful youth academy, producing players such as Adam Lallana, Theo Walcott, Luke Shaw, and Gareth Bale.

Stadium: St. Mary’s Stadium: 32,689 capacity

Notable players:

Alan Ball, M, (1976-1980, 1981-1983)

Wayne Bridge, D, (1998-2003)

Peter Shilton, GK, (1982-1987)

Terry Paine, M, (1957-1974)

Mick Channon, F, (1965-1977, 1979-1982)

Matthew Le Tissier, M, (1986-2002)

Fun facts:

Southampton have sold 5 players to Liverpool since 2014

They have won the Southern League 6 times from 1896-1903

Theo Walcott became the youngest player to play for England in 2006

The team almost went bankrupt in the early 2000’s

Swansea City A.F.C (The Swans)

Overview: Swansea City AFC was founded in 1912 in Swansea, Wales as Swansea Town before changing their name to their current in 1969. They joined the football league in 1921 and were promoted to the Football League First Division 1981. In 2011, Swansea were promoted to the Premier League and in 2013 they won the Football League Cup-the 1st major trophy in the club’s history. For most of their time as a club, the team has done quite poorly and not participated in the top league. Once they were promoted to the Premier League in 2011, they became the first Welsh team to play in the top division. They have managed to stay in the Premier League since.

Stadium: Liberty Stadium, 21,088 capacity

Notable Players:

Wilfred Milne, D (1920-1937)

Alan Curtis, F (1972-1979, 1980-1983, 1989-1990)

Roger Freestone, GK, (1991-2004)

Wyndham Evans, D (1971-1985)

Gary Monk, D (2004-2013)

Robbie James, M (1973-1983, 1988-1990)

Fun facts:

They are the first Welsh team to play in the Premier League

Swansea is Wales’ second largest city

They are the only Premier League team not to have reached the final of the FA cup

They had a manager who lasted only 7 days, Kevin Cullis

They have had 3 managers this current season

Sunderland A.F.C. (The Black Cats)

Overview: Sunderland is based in the North-East city of Sunderland and was founded in 1879. They remained in the top league for 68 successive seasons before being relegated for the first time in 1958. They have won the top-flight First Division 6 times before it became the Premier League. They have won the FA Cup twice and the FA Community Shield once. After initial successes, Sunderland won their last major trophy in 1973. They have the 7th highest average home attendance of the 20 Premier League clubs. They have remained in the Premier League since 2007 and have since become one of the world’s wealthiest football brands.

Stadium: Stadium of Light, 49,000 capacity

Notable players:

Jimmy Montgomery, GK, (1960-1977)

Jermain Defoe, F (present)

Julia Arca, M, (2000-2006)

Niall Quinn, F, (1996-2002)

Fun facts:

Sunderland broke the record transfer fee 3 times in the 20th century

They broke the record for most points in the Championship (105) in 1999

One of the 1st clubs to enter the Football League in 1890

They have only spent 1 season out of the top 2 tiers of English Football

 

Bobcats fall in final regular season game; Marcus Delpeche ‘17 reaches milestone on senior day

Sunday, February 12 the men’s basketball team took on the Williams College Ephs (17-7, 5-5 NESCAC) and lost a tight one 65-62.

The Bobcats led for most of the first half, as Max Hummel ‘19 hit a three to put Bates up 21-12 with 9:00 left in the first half. The Ephs kept fighting, going on a 6-0 run before Marcus Delpeche ’17 hit a layup to push Bates’ lead 23-18 with 66:13 left. Williams would take the lead and not give it up with 4:59 left in the first half with a three from Bobby Casey, which capped off an 8-0 run to put them up 26-23. The Bobcats kept pushing back, cutting the deficit to one three times before the half. The Ephs would go into the half with a 36-32 lead.

Down 59-49 with 6:46 to go in the game, Bates turned up the heat. Quin Leary hit the first of back-to-back jumpers to cut the deficit to six with five minutes left. Then Marcus Delpeche jammed a dunk and Jerome Darling drained a three to cut the score 59-58 in favor of the Ephs with 2:38 remaining in the game.

A wide open Bobby Casey in the left wing knocked down a huge three to push the advantage back to four with 2:10 left in the game.

Jeff Spellman ‘20 finessed a layup with 1:11 remaining to cut the deficit to two but Williams answered with another three, extending the Williams advantage to 65-60 with 43 seconds left on the clock. Another Spellman layup made the score 65-62. Bates got one last chance to tie the game after the Ephs turned the ball over with just under three seconds remaining, but it was not enough for the Bobcats to tie the game.

Bates was very poor from downtown, shooting a mere 20%. Williams shot 42% from the field as Bates only shot 38%. Williams had ten more turnovers (19) than Bates (9) but the Bobcats could not capitalize.

Marcus Delpeche ‘17 became the 33rd player to reach 1,000 career points (1,007). He needed ten to achieve this and netted 1,000 with 3:09 in the first half. He also led the team in points and rebounds, 17 and 12 respectively, notching another double-double. Jeff Spellman led the team in assists with seven. Williams’ Daniel Aronowitz had a game-high 22 points, scoring at will when needed.

The Bobcats honored their six seniors on Sunday. Darling, the Delpeche twins, Leary, co-captain Connor McLeod and Max Eaton all played their final home games for Bates.

The Bobcats entered the NESCAC Playoffs as the No. 7 seed, and were set for a date with second seeded Middlebury in the first round of the tournament. The Bobcats season came to an end in this contest after a tough fight against the Panthers, eventually falling 88-84.

Senior brothers Marcus Delpeche and Malcolm Delpeche led Bates with 18 and 17 points, respectively, with 12 of those points coming in the second half of the final game as a Bobcat. The underclass trio of guards Tom Coyne ‘20, Nick Gilpin ‘20 and Jeff Spellman ‘20 all achieved double figures as well with 15, 14 and 10 points, respectively. Gilpin tallied a season-high in points, and also recorded six assists.

Middlebury’s Matt St. Amour dropped 34 points, making 11-of-21 shots from the field and shooting 47% from three-point range. St. Amour’s 21 points in the first half helped give the Panthers a 43-33 at the break; he then overcame a slow start to the second half to score 13 points in the final 7:20, helping the Panthers hold off a final Bates rally.

Turnovers hurt the Bobcats; they committed 18 compared to Middlebury’s eight. The Bobcats rallied in the second half, erasing a 17-point deficit but it was not be enough to overcome the cushion the Panthers created.

Both Delpeche twins received honors at the end of the season. Marcus was selected to the First Team All-NESCAC while his brother Malcolm was named NESCAC Defensive Player of the Year.

The Bobcats finished the season with a record of 15-10. It was the last game for seniors Jerome Darling, Max Eaton, Quin Leary, and Conor McLeod.

 

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