The Bates Student

The Voice of Bates College since 1873

Day: March 8, 2017 (Page 1 of 3)

Bates sees the light, Moonlight that is

Chiron: in Greek mythology he is the famed tutor responsible for teaching some of the great heroes, from Achilles to Hercules, Theseus to Jason. But the Bates campus learned on Wednesday, March 1 that Chiron could also refer to the protagonist in Barry Jenkins’ Academy Award winning film, Moonlight. Jointly put on by Filmboard and the Office of Intercultural Education (OIE), the Moonlight screening and discussion afterwards was a way for the Bates community to experience the film and then have a safe space in which to unpack their feelings, questions, or concerns.

In this film, the audience follows Chiron through his life and gets to see all the pivot points and experiences that result in his adult persona. Split into three parts, the movie follows a fairly simply chronological trajectory, posing hard-hitting questions with thought provoking themes.

Maddie Auvinen ’17, a biochemistry major and President of Filmboard, organized the event in conjunction with Julisa De Los Santos, Assistant Dean in the OIE. In an interview, Auvinen remembered, “Julisa and I had talked about showing Moonlight very briefly last semester. I had never heard of the film, but looked up a few trailers and reviews, and thought it would be great to show at Bates.”

After the screening, the audience was invited to stay for a discussion facilitated by Calvin Reedy ’17 and Rhetoric Professor Charles I. Nero. Reedy, an Art & Visual Culture major, often frequents the OIE and was happy when De Los Santos asked him to help lead the discussion. Reedy remarks that, “Julisa asked me specifically because she is very familiar with my studio art thesis work…My body of work in photography and video explores ways to rethink and re-present notions of black masculinity; focusing a lot on tenderness and vulnerability, both with oneself and with others.” Reedy was able to use his thesis knowledge base as a springboard to help propel, steer, and assist the conversation taking place after the credits rolled.

There is more to this movie than its overt tones and topics. Reedy wants the community to “realize that black films don’t have to be about racism to be worthy of being watched and celebrated. There are stories that deserve to be told as well, and that are moving for all people. There don’t need to be white saviors – or in the case of Moonlight, there don’t even need to be white people – for a black film to be excellent.”

Simultaneously, the film was able to bring out salient messages to the audience, be a popular attraction, and shake the foundation of Hollywood, even if just a little. By granting Moonlight the Academy Award, it joins the ranks of giants standing proudly beside Casablanca, Rain Man, and Schindler’s List, to name a few. Hollywood acknowledges that a small budget film with an all-black cast can make a prodigious impact. And by choosing to show it here at Bates and getting the huge turnout from our community illustrates that our college and its inhabitants share this sentiment. Auvinen noted that over one hundred people reserved tickets for the event, an almost unprecedented number for a Filmboard event.

Maybe it all goes back to the name. Chiron. He educates each and every person who sits down to watch the movie and maybe that is what drew much of our community to the Mays Center that Wednesday night. White, Black, Hispanic, Asia, Jewish, Muslim, Christian, immigrant, it does not matter. Once you sit down to watch this movie, Chiron teaches you about his world, about the world many Americans know, the work that many refuse to acknowledge, and about which many are content to forget.

 

A glimpse into the six percent

“One week really hurt my room.” Anonymous ‘20 laughs, as she pushes open the door to her room.

At first glance, her room appears like that of any other Bates student. Clothing is strewn across the floor, band posters scatter across the wall above her unmade bed, and a Keurig machine sits on the bureau in the corner, enshrined with a multitude of empty K-Cups. On her crowded desk, however, something stands out. Sandwiched between The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Bell Jar, is the hallmark blue-and-green binding which any recent high school graduate knows all too-well: The Fiske Guide to Colleges: 2017.

With the recent deadline of March 1 for many transfer students, Anonymous has just submitted applications to three colleges: Tufts, Brown, and Yale.

Transferring, as she tells me, is by no means a simple process. Transfer students must go through all the basic steps of the college-bound senior. Students submit transcripts, letters of recommendation, the common application, along with slightly-modified supplementary essays for transfer admission. With all of these components of the application, on top of a four-class Bates course load, transferring can require months of work.

So, what isn’t working for these students?

Understandably, the reasons differ. While some transfer students seek out a particular major not offered at Bates, others yearn to escape a part of campus culture. For Anonymous, her reasons were largely social: “I thought I wasn’t fitting in, as I am normally a friendly person.” Citing this aspect social life as a major reason for her transfer, Anonymous continues: “I knew that I was friendly to begin with, so it couldn’t be that.”

Having just clicked the submit button on the Common Application, Anonymous gave me a glimpse into what it’s like being fresh out of the transfer process. To hear from the other end of the process, I spoke with Maddie Lang ‘20, a spring semester transfer currently at the Miami University in Ohio.

Lang’s reasons, on the other hand, largely revolved around the size of Bates. For Lang, “Bates was too small and I got bored there within the first week. Miami offers more social [Greek] life, more majors and minors, football games, baseball games, hockey games, etc. that students actually attend.” She believes that with these opportunities, there is a stronger sense of “school spirit and community” at Miami than there is at Bates.

Though many students seek to transfer after their first year, some plan to transfer for junior year. Just beginning the transfer process, Anonymous #2 ‘20 is one of these students. Similar to the first student I spoke with, her feeling’s are also social: “I feel as though my personality is muted by the community. I’ve experienced a lot of judgmental attitudes from people. A lot of people are stuck in this idea of what they have to be… and I don’t fit that formula.” With Wesleyan and Reed at the top of her list, Anonymous #2 will be submitting applications at around this time next year.

Bates is not an anomaly in terms of transfer students. With Bowdoin’s retention rate of 98%, and 93% at Colby, Bates’ retention rate of 94% is certainly in the ballpark of our neighboring institutions. But nonetheless, it is important to glimpse a population which often times, remains invisible to the larger Bates community. While we can rest assured that many of our fellow students find a home in Lewiston — let’s consider the six percent of students who do not.

How Hayes House became Hayes Art Gallery

This Friday, March 3, Hayes House hosted an art exhibit in its basement. The exhibition, named Splinters, contained sculptures, photographs, drawings, paintings, small installations and performances, all curated by the residents of the house. The show was composed of 61 very diverse artworks and four live performances. The ceiling, floor, and wall spaces in the basement of Hayes House were filled with art, people, or lighting equipment. It was clear that there had been a lot of work involved in constructing that atmosphere. Even though the art and the lighting were exceptional, the diverse crowd was a surprise. Splinters accomplished something that professional community galleries sometimes struggle with; it is hard to bridge the gap between different groups of people.

In interview, I asked the organizers of the show how Hayes House Basement became Hayes Art Gallery. Jack Shea ’19, one of the coordinators of the show and resident of Hayes House, told me that everyone in Hayes is involved in the art scene at Bates. Shea also made sure to acknowledge the help from the Bates Musicians Union for lending the audio equipment and connecting the event to student bands.

The show also counted with the help of the Bates Arts Society for planning the event and printing some of the 39 photographs displayed in the show. This comes to show that the Hayes Art Gallery was more than a spontaneous, pop-up event. It had required a couple weeks of preparation. Splinters is the result of the collective efforts of the art community at Bates to make art alive and accessible to everyone.

Alongside with the 61 pieces, Splinters had four acts perform. The live music brought many students that would not have attended the gallery otherwise. Many students showed surprise at the diversity of the group at Hayes, especially regarding the presence of athletes. While athletics are most certainly not contradictory with artistic productions or appreciation, the surprise of many students is representative of what Hayes Art Gallery has accomplished: it provided yet another space for an open celebration of student accomplishment in the arts in an informal setting.

According to Jesse Saffeir ’20, Splinters was the perfect combination of Bates’ student life and its arts scene. While throughout the night most of the attention was towards the performances, the gallery allowed for students to be immersed with art, even if that was not their primary interest. “This is a study in art politics,” said recent winter 2017 graduate Adam Maurey in regards to the theme and turnout of the gallery opening.

According to Shea, the purpose of Splinter was “to get involved in the student arts at Bates, and to get other people excited about it.” The theme came from Peter Nadel ’19, focusing on the creation of fragmented narratives through artistic creation.

In conjunction with the exhibition, Shea mentioned his candidacy for the vice-presidency of the student government, alongside with Zach Campbell ’19, running for president. Shea mentioned that, even though his running for the position was independent from the art show, his platform does include more student involvement in the arts at Bates.

“While Splinters was just the one night, we do look to help orchestrate future events in student arts at Bates,” said Shea. Hayes Art Gallery: Splinters is one of many upcoming informal celebrations of student accomplishment and creativity in the arts.

 

A glimpse into the six percent

“One week really hurt my room.” Anonymous 20’ laughs, as she pushes open the door to her room.

At first glance, her room appears like that of any other Bates student. Clothing is strewn across the floor, band posters scatter across the wall above her unmade bed, and a Keurig machine sits on the bureau in the corner, enshrined with a multitude of empty K-Cups. On her crowded desk, however, something stands out. Sandwiched between The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Bell Jar, is the hallmark blue-and-green binding which any recent high school graduate knows all too-well: The Fiske Guide to Colleges: 2017.

With the recent deadline of March 1 for many transfer students, Jane has just submitted applications to three colleges: Tufts, Brown, and Yale.

Transferring, as she tells me, is by no means a simple process. Transfer students must go through all the basic steps of the college-bound senior. Students submit transcripts, letters of recommendation, the common application, along with slightly-modified supplementary essays for transfer admission. With all of these components of the application, on top of a four-class Bates course load, transferring can require months of work.

So, what isn’t working for these students?

Understandably, the reasons differ. While some transfer students seek out a particular major not offered at Bates, others yearn to escape a part of campus culture. For Anonymous, her reasons were largely social: “I thought I wasn’t fitting in, as I am normally a friendly person.” Citing this aspect social life as a major reason for her transfer, Anonymous continues: “I knew that I was friendly to begin with, so it couldn’t be that.”

Having just clicked the submit button on the Common Application, Anonymous gave me a glimpse into what it’s like being fresh out of the transfer process. To hear from the other end of the process, I spoke with Maddie Lang ‘20, a spring semester transfer currently at the Miami University in Ohio.

Lang’s reasons, on the other hand, largely revolved around the size of Bates. For Lang, “Bates was too small and I got bored there within the first week. Miami offers more social [Greek] life, more majors and minors, football games, baseball games, hockey games, etc. that students actually attend.” She believes that with these opportunities, there is a stronger sense of “school spirit and community” at Miami than there is at Bates.

Though many students seek to transfer after their first year, some plan to transfer for junior year. Just beginning the transfer process, Anonymous #2 ‘20 is one of these students. Similar to the first student I spoke with, her feeling’s are also social: “I feel as though my personality is muted by the community. I’ve experienced a lot of judgmental attitudes from people. A lot of people are stuck in this idea of what they have to be… and I don’t fit that formula.” With Wesleyan and Reed at the top of her list, Anonymous #2 will be submitting applications at around this time next year.

Bates is not an anomaly in terms of transfer students. With Bowdoin’s retention rate of 98%, and 93% at Colby, Bates’ retention rate of 94% is certainly in the ballpark of our neighboring institutions. But nonetheless, it is important to glimpse a population which often times, remains invisible to the larger Bates community. While we can rest assured that many of our fellow students find a home in Lewiston — let’s consider the six percent of students who do not.

“The moral imperative of revolt”

Hedges speaks about liberal institutions in upholding morals. CHRISTINA PERRONE/THE BATES STUDENT

Hedges speaks about liberal institutions in upholding morals. CHRISTINA PERRONE/THE BATES STUDENT

Few have been as politically active as Chris Hedges, an accomplished Pulitzer Prizewinning journalist and ordained Presbyterian minister. Bates invited the author to campus on the Tuesday before February Break to talk about his recent book, Wages of Rebellion: The Moral Imperative of Revolt , and about how we have reached this predicament in our country.

Last Tuesday, Betsy DeVos was nominated as the education secretary. DeVos is a proponent of antidisestablishmentarian school vouchers and the growth of for-profit schools that harm the United States’ public school system. As Hedges said, “She will dismantle and defund one of the crown jewels of American Democracy, and that is our system of public education. And I’m going to talk a little bit tonight about how we got to where we are.”

Hedges believes that Trump is a product of forty years. It began in 1971, when Lewis Powell, who was then an attorney for the Chamber of Commerce, wrote a confidential memorandum that was a blueprint for conservative corporations to reclaim America for the chamber. Hedges states that the Powell Memo was “a reaction to the opening up of American Democracy in the 1960s.” Now, according to Hedges, “Trump is a prophet of that coup d’etat. Because what happened in that four decade long period was that the liberal institutions themselves were hollowed out and became façades…the foundations are being eroded.”

These liberal institutions include the press, universities, and courts. In reference to Noam Chomsky, an activist, psychologist and philosopher, Hedges said, “But those liberal institutions…worked as a kind of safety valve. They were a mechanism in times of distress, economic breakdown in the 1930s, could ameliorate the sufferer, address the grievances.”

The liberal institution is a favor or advantage granted or expected in return for something. This is because these institutions set the boundaries of acceptable criticism and debate. According to Hedges, “As soon as you start attacking capitalism itself, or as soon as you start questioning the virtues of the leadership you are pushed out of the liberal establishment. And the liberal establishment is used to demonize you. I saw this as a journalist.”

Throughout his talk Hedges incorporated historical perspectives along with personal anecdotes from his time reporting overseas and teaching in Princeton, New Jersey prisons. Near the middle of his talk he discussed how American democracy was created as a sort of closed system with the electoral college and the marginalization of African Americans, women, and even non-property holding men.

The Democratic Party, until now, has long supported popular movements. As Hedges puts it, “It’s a battle on the part of popular movements to open up the space in American Democracy.” A functioning liberal elite, according to Hedges, “could address enough of the grievances [of movements] in order to keep a kind of equilibrium. But unfortunately in their own myopic greed, what these corporate and business entities did was destroy these movements in the name of anti-communism, purging … academia and the arts.”

Recent movements such as Occupy Wall Street and Standing Rock have brought an alternative, and unrestrained press or media platform that the traditional press, subservient to corporate power, could not express. The control of media outlets by corporate enterprises has evolved over the decades: “The press is being consolidate, a half dozen corporations controlling roughly 95% what Americans watch and listen to…But these are giant corporations where media and news are just one revenue stream out of perhaps hundreds of revenue streams, and that compete with hundreds of revenue streams.”

In the 2016 election, Trump received so much air time because he was entertaining, and during his talk Hedges reasoned, “that’s why the press, at first, was complicit in the rise of Donald Trump – not only because they created this fictional vision of him as a great economic titan on a reality television show, but because he drew in revenue. He got 23 times more the air time than Sanders…Because Sanders spoke about policy, he wasn’t entertainment.”

What Hedges proposes is to leave the Democratic Establishment and establish a leftist party concerned with economic justice. As he said, “We cannot build a just society. We cannot confront institutional economic form of racism and oppression unless we confront the military industrial complex.”

So as the Democratic Party continues to speak in the old language of liberalism, “You have a backlash against liberal institutions that have betrayed working men and women, even in the middle class…when they turn on the institutions, they also turn on the supposed values [like] tolerance.”

A huge reason why Hillary Clinton and the Democratic Establishment did not win the presidency was because they ignored the white working class, that then turned to Trump. According to Hedge, “They were betrayed. Their anger is legitimate and they were betrayed by people like us who busied ourselves with a boutique kind of activism about gender identity and multiculturalism—none of which I’m against—but not when it is divorced from the fundamental issue of justice.”

As Hedges said, “Unfortunately [we] fell into this pattern of the least worse. And that pattern of the least worst paved the way for the worst, which we have now.” The only way to change this trend is to participate in politics. Chris Hedges has been arrested several times protesting in the streets. He sued the Obama Administration in 2013 over the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (NDAA) because it allowed the arrest of individuals associated with the Al-Qaeda without access to an attorney or habeas corpus relief.

You never know when you stand up and carry out an act of conscience, an act of rebellion, the effect it has: “That is the moral power of resistance. It is an act of faith. And it is imperative for our time that we stand up. And it won’t be pleasant. I don’t like going to jail, it’s more time than I care to donate to the government. But these people are working at lightning speed and we have no time left.”

At a time when our nation needs leaders to emerge out of the woodwork and represent the interests of Americans on a moral level, it is imperative that individuals like Chris Hedges continue to voice their opinions and receive recognition for their representation of the people.

Where’s the protein at?

What if I told you that a world heavyweight boxing legend doesn’t consume meat or any animal products? How about a tennis star who has consistently dominated her competition for a decade? How about an NFL running back who led the league in rushing for multiple seasons? You may not believe it, but Mike Tyson, Serena Williams, and Arian Foster are all vegans, and while you may view this dietary choice as a hurdle to overcome, the athletes themselves claim that they have never felt better.

When looking for protein-rich foods, people usually turn to animal products and meat. While meat is a great source of protein and other nutrients such as vitamin B12 and iron, overconsumption, especially of red meat, has been linked to heart disease, obesity, and various forms of cancer. If you’re wondering what overconsumption looks like, think more than two servings per day. Alternatives such as poultry and fish are certainly healthier options, but plant-based proteins often get overlooked. Certain grains, such as quinoa and brown rice, are packed not only with protein, but also other nutrients that cannot be found in meat– such as fiber– which supports a healthy digestive system. Lentils, nuts, and beans are also high in protein as well as healthy fats, essential for heart and brain health. The easiest way to optimize your nutrition is to practice moderation and variation, as both meat and plant-based foods offer unique benefits. Commons provides plenty of options for both plant based proteins and lean meats in every meal, so achieving a balanced and healthy diet is made easily accessible.

In addition to the health benefits of eating more plant-based foods, a more balanced diet also holds environmental implications. Consider the following: From birth to the time of slaughter, which takes around two years, cows have to be fed, provided water, and cared for. But how much energy goes into that care? It requires as much as 20 pounds of corn in order to produce one pound of edible beef, which essentially means that consuming plant-based alternatives is significantly more environmentally sustainable than consuming meat. Although eating meat in moderation has been a natural part of human life throughout history, factory meat production in the last century has grown to unnatural proportions, exploiting the environment’s resources and fostering a diet centered disproportionately around meat.

While nothing about eating meat is inherently wrong, the way that humans produce and consume meat in today’s society has serious health and environmental consequences. The solution is not necessarily for everyone to go vegan, but rather for all of us to look critically at our own eating habits and make more intentional choices. It’s far too easy to subsist on meat without thinking about the implications of that choice. We hope that you take this into account the next time you’re in Commons. Even if it’s replacing just one meat dish at your next meal, your planet and you body will thank you!

Bobcats fall in final regular season game; Marcus Delpeche ‘17 reaches milestone on senior day

Sunday, February 12 the men’s basketball team took on the Williams College Ephs (17-7, 5-5 NESCAC) and lost a tight one 65-62.

The Bobcats led for most of the first half, as Max Hummel ‘19 hit a three to put Bates up 21-12 with 9:00 left in the first half. The Ephs kept fighting, going on a 6-0 run before Marcus Delpeche ’17 hit a layup to push Bates’ lead 23-18 with 66:13 left. Williams would take the lead and not give it up with 4:59 left in the first half with a three from Bobby Casey, which capped off an 8-0 run to put them up 26-23. The Bobcats kept pushing back, cutting the deficit to one three times before the half. The Ephs would go into the half with a 36-32 lead.

Down 59-49 with 6:46 to go in the game, Bates turned up the heat. Quin Leary hit the first of back-to-back jumpers to cut the deficit to six with five minutes left. Then Marcus Delpeche jammed a dunk and Jerome Darling drained a three to cut the score 59-58 in favor of the Ephs with 2:38 remaining in the game.

A wide open Bobby Casey in the left wing knocked down a huge three to push the advantage back to four with 2:10 left in the game.

Jeff Spellman ‘20 finessed a layup with 1:11 remaining to cut the deficit to two but Williams answered with another three, extending the Williams advantage to 65-60 with 43 seconds left on the clock. Another Spellman layup made the score 65-62. Bates got one last chance to tie the game after the Ephs turned the ball over with just under three seconds remaining, but it was not enough for the Bobcats to tie the game.

Bates was very poor from downtown, shooting a mere 20%. Williams shot 42% from the field as Bates only shot 38%. Williams had ten more turnovers (19) than Bates (9) but the Bobcats could not capitalize.

Marcus Delpeche ‘17 became the 33rd player to reach 1,000 career points (1,007). He needed ten to achieve this and netted 1,000 with 3:09 in the first half. He also led the team in points and rebounds, 17 and 12 respectively, notching another double-double. Jeff Spellman led the team in assists with seven. Williams’ Daniel Aronowitz had a game-high 22 points, scoring at will when needed.

The Bobcats honored their six seniors on Sunday. Darling, the Delpeche twins, Leary, co-captain Connor McLeod and Max Eaton all played their final home games for Bates.

The Bobcats entered the NESCAC Playoffs as the No. 7 seed, and were set for a date with second seeded Middlebury in the first round of the tournament. The Bobcats season came to an end in this contest after a tough fight against the Panthers, eventually falling 88-84.

Senior brothers Marcus Delpeche and Malcolm Delpeche led Bates with 18 and 17 points, respectively, with 12 of those points coming in the second half of the final game as a Bobcat. The underclass trio of guards Tom Coyne ‘20, Nick Gilpin ‘20 and Jeff Spellman ‘20 all achieved double figures as well with 15, 14 and 10 points, respectively. Gilpin tallied a season-high in points, and also recorded six assists.

Middlebury’s Matt St. Amour dropped 34 points, making 11-of-21 shots from the field and shooting 47% from three-point range. St. Amour’s 21 points in the first half helped give the Panthers a 43-33 at the break; he then overcame a slow start to the second half to score 13 points in the final 7:20, helping the Panthers hold off a final Bates rally.

Turnovers hurt the Bobcats; they committed 18 compared to Middlebury’s eight. The Bobcats rallied in the second half, erasing a 17-point deficit but it was not be enough to overcome the cushion the Panthers created.

Both Delpeche twins received honors at the end of the season. Marcus was selected to the First Team All-NESCAC while his brother Malcolm was named NESCAC Defensive Player of the Year.

The Bobcats finished the season with a record of 15-10. It was the last game for seniors Jerome Darling, Max Eaton, Quin Leary, and Conor McLeod.

 

Navigating Los Angeles like a local

I am very confused by Los Angeles. I was told I was visiting the second largest city in the country, but Los Angeles is less of a city and more of a collection of towns connected by congested roadways. However, those towns are incredibly beautiful and very different from one another. There are the beaches and canals in Venice, the traditional city buildings in Downtown, the posh Beverly Hills, the hipster Silver Lake, and the classic Hollywood scene.

Los Angeles is not a walking city, not in the slightest. When my mom and I asked for recommendations for a breakfast place we could walk to from our hotel, we were met with confusion on how we could possibly want to walk anywhere. Lewiston is no walking-haven, but I was not expecting Los Angeles to be so spread out.

Luckily my mom has her life together, so we had our days planned in ways that mostly made sense travel-wise. I had no idea that Downtown Los Angeles was far from Venice Beach, which was also no where near Silver Lake, which is far from Hollywood, which is not even close to West Hollywood, which is on the opposite side of town from Santa Monica. Only an expert of the board game Ticket to Ride would be able to perfectly navigate Los Angeles.

A trip to Los Angeles would not be complete without going on a hike. We went to Runyon Canyon – which I later found out is known as the “Starbucks of hikes.” Nonetheless, it offered a great view of the city. I built up a sweat and was thoroughly out of breath once I got to the top, so it felt like a substantial hike to me. It also felt like every single dog was being walked on the canyon, with one woman walking at least 10 dogs at once.

Now, I love traffic as much as next person, but Los Angeles takes traffic to the next level. My stomach dropped every time we approached the freeway; it was like getting an exam back and knowing you failed. It took a half hour to get anywhere: either you suffer through freeway traffic or you take the back roads that also somehow have traffic and enough stop signs to cover the whole country.

This will be my only La La Land reference, but the movie falsely advertised what the Griffith Observatory was like. In the movie, they could go at night, the place was empty and they could just drive right up to it. I do not know what alternate universe the movie was taking place in, but the real Griffith Observatory was certainly not empty. We went around 8:00 p.m. on Thursday night, not expecting a huge crowd. We encountered traffic (of course) on the way to the observatory since one of the two roads going to the observatory was closed. It turned out the road was closed because a large tour bus got stuck, blocking the whole road. It was a mess, and it felt like the bus had brought hundreds of people to the observatory because it was absolutely packed.

I braved the surprisingly cold night to wait in line to see Venus and fought for a spot to get the perfect picture. The tour bus caused us to get off schedule and we started to get hungry. Our situation became dire once we realized no Uber driver would be able to come and get us. The cold and hunger were fighting us; walking down the mountain did not seem feasible. Luckily a nearby Uber driver overheard us fighting and offered us a ride to the bottom of the mountain. Our observatory experience was probably more aligned with the real Los Angeles than La La Land.

 

News and notes from Bates athletics

Skiing

Three Bates skiers will compete at the NCAA championships in Jackson, New Hampshire starting today. Nordic skier Sadie James ‘17 qualified after completing an historic victory in the women’s 5-kilometer race at the Bates Carnival on February 24. James, who won the event by over 20 seconds, will be competing at nationals for the second consecutive year. Alpine skiers Kelsey Chenoweth ‘17 and Michael Cooper ‘19 qualified from the East Region. Cooper is making his national championships debut, while Chenoweth is returning for the second time.

Men’s Squash

Ahmed Hatata ‘17 competed in the Collegiate Squash Association’s individual national championships this past weekend, losing in the quarterfinals to top-seeded Osama Khalifa from Columbia University. Hatata, who was named NESCAC men’s squash player of the year last week, was trying to win Bates’ third consecutive men’s individual squash national championship, after Ahmed Abdel Khalek ‘16 won the title each of the past two seasons.

Basketball

The women’s basketball team qualified for the NESCAC postseason conference tournament for the second consecutive year, and for the second consecutive year the team fell to perennial power, Amherst. Men’s star Marcus Delpeche ‘17, with his second-half layup against Williams in Bates’ 65-62 loss on February 12, scored the 1,000th point of his career. He is the 33rd Bobcat men’s basketball player to accomplish the feat.

Indoor Track

The men’s and women’s indoor track teams will join a small cohort of competitors to the NCAA Division III national championships at North Central College in Naperville, IL this weekend. This marks the final indoor event of the season, before both teams will brave the elements when the outdoor spring season gets underway.

 

Large cohort of Bates winter athletics bring home all-conference awards

23 Bates winter athletes received all-conference recognition for their feats over the course of the 2016-17 season. Malcolm Delpeche ‘17 was named men’s basketball NESCAC Defensive Player of the Year. Delpeche averaged 1.0 steal, 6.1 defensive rebounds, and 3.2 blocks per game during conference play this year. Ahmed Hatata ‘17 was named the men’s squash NESCAC player of the year. He finished the regular season with an impressive 19-1 overall record. Here are the rest of the awards:

NESCAC Awards

Men’s Squash

Ahmed Hatata ‘17 – NESCAC Men’s Squash Player of the Year

Mahmoud Yousry ’20 – NESCAC All-Conference First Team

Darrius Campbell ’17 – NESCAC All-Conference First Team

Women’s Squash

Luca Polgar ’20 – NESCAC All-Conference First Team

Vicky Arjoon ’19 – NESCAC All-Conference First Team

Kristyna Alexova ’19 – NESCAC All-Conference First Team

Men’s Basketball

Marcus Delpeche ’17 – NESCAC All-Conference First Team

Malcolm Delpeche ’17 – NESCAC Defensive Player of the Year

Women’s Basketball

Allie Coppola ’17 – NESCAC All-Conference Second Team

Men’s Swimming

Riley Ewing ’18 – NESCAC All-Conference Mention

Jonathan Depew ’18 – NESCAC All-Conference Mention

Dan Walpole ’17 – NESCAC All-Conference Mention

Alexander Ignatov ’20 – NESCAC All-Conference Mention

Theodore Pender ’18 – NESCAC All-Conference Mention

Women’s Swimming

Sarah Daher ’17 – NESCAC All-Conference Mention

Janika Ho ’20 – NESCAC All-Conference Mention

Emma Jarczyk ’17 – NESCAC All-Conference Mention

Logan McGill ’18 – NESCAC All-Conference Mention

Kristy Prelgovisk ’19 – NESCAC All-Conference Mention

Monica Sears ’20 – NESCAC All-Conference Mention

Anabel Carter ’18 – NESCAC All-Conference Mention

Emma Lammers ’19 – NESCAC All-Conference Mention

Lucy Faust ’20 – NESCAC All-Conference Mentions

*Indoor track conference awards are not given until the completion of the spring season. The alpine and nordic ski teams do not compete in the NESCAC.

 

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