The Bates Student

The Voice of Bates College since 1873

Day: November 4, 2015 (Page 1 of 2)

T-Pain: Anything but painful

Get excited! On Saturday, November 7th, T-Pain is performing at the Big Fall Concert. All thanks to the Chase Hall Committee (CHC), who is responsible for planning most of the events considered Bates traditions.

For those who do not know, T-Pain is a successful singer, recording artist, songwriter, rapper, record producer, entrepreneur and actor. He is known for popularizing the “Auto-tune” technique: the use of computer software to manipulate one’s pitch. T-Pain, his stage name, is short for “Tallahassee Pain,” after the hardships he faced while growing up there. He has come a long way; he founded his own record label, Nappy Boy Entertainment, in 2005, and has been featured on countless hit songs, including Flo Rida’s debut single, “Low.” He is a two time Grammy Award Winner and his second album, Epiphany, released in 2007, reached Number 1 on Billboard charts.

CHC prides itself on putting the student body first in all its decisions. In a democratic fashion, T-Pain was chosen through an online survey sent to students over the summer. The survey included popular artists Rae Sremmurd, B.O.B, and Rich Homie Quan, as well as two country singers. During the summer, the responses were overwhelmingly in favor of T-Pain. And students still stand-by their choice: CHC ended up overselling the number of allowed subsidized student tickets, totalling over 1300.

The concert is sponsored and funded by both the Chase Hall Committee and the Student Government Co-sponsorship fund.

According to the CHC board, “we wanted to bring an act to campus that truly checked all of the boxes—an act that everyone could rally behind and that separated Bates from other colleges.”

Ten years since his debut album was released, T-Pain will release his new album, Stoicville: The Phoenix, this December. According to T-Pain on his official website, “every song on this album is something that came out of my heart.”

In past years, the CHC has sponsored many highly anticipated and well-attended annual campus-wide events. Performers at the Big Fall Concert have included Icona Pop, K’Naan, and Chainsmokers. Other popular events include dances, such as 80’s, 90’s, Halloween, and the newly added Millennial Dance. Bates holds the nation’s second oldest collegiate Winter Carnival, a Block Party, hosts various comedians and hypnotists, and organizes Big Prize Bingo, among other events. CHC’s main goals are to provide “fun, safe, inclusive events on campus” for students.

Interested in helping plan these exciting events yourself? Attend their weekly meetings on Mondays at 8pm in Chase Hall. Anyone is welcome. All meetings are publicized in Bates Today.

The CHC encourages “anyone who wishes to voice ideas, opinions, or concerns, to attend—we are always looking for new ideas to put into action.”

For additional information about Chase Hall Committee, please refer to the clubs & organizations page on the Bates website.

First Lingua Franca: why do we self-segregate at Bates?

Negative reactions to last year’s show of activism prompted students and faculty to create a safe environment for important issues to be discussed. This idea took the form of Lingua Franca, the first gathering held last Wednesday, at which students, faculty and staff discussed “Why do people self-segregate at Bates?”

Annakay Wright, a member of the class of 2017, organized a die-in last year in Commons to “spark and encourage conversation about the Black Lives Matter movement. Many of us on campus felt like, besides a few attempts by black-led groups on campus, no one was truly interested in discussing what was and is happening in our nation in terms of the criminalization of black bodies that have led to the death of so many black individuals by law enforcement,” Wright said.

After the die-in, Wright and fellow protesters were shocked by a number of negative and racist comments on Yik Yak. They, therefore, printed the yik yaks out and compiled them on a board with the Bates mission statement.

The board was “a means of a juxtaposition to compare what Bates says it is and what some Bates students actually believed,” Wright said.

After delivering the board to President Clayton Spencer and meeting with Associate Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer Crystal Williams, the wheels were set in motion for the development of Lingua Franca.

“From my perspective, part of the challenge we all face on campus and in the country is that it is increasingly difficult to engage in frank, respectful, and open conversation with people who you don’t know and may hold fundamentally different ideas and beliefs,” Williams said. “So another hope is that Lingua Franca provides a space in which people can be truly curious.”

Wednesday’s discussion centered on the issue of self-segregation at Bates. Panelists started the forum, offering some comments as a framework for the small group discussions that followed. The panelists were Director of Research, Analysis and Planning Ann Marie Russell, Lisa Choi ’17, Associate Dean of Students for Residence Life and Health Education & Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Counselor Erin Foster-Zsiga and Associate Professor of Psychology Helen Boucher.

Choi, a sociology and politics major, sent out a survey last Short Term in which one of the questions was “based on respondents’ perception of how other students formed groups,” Choi clarified in a follow-up email. Sharing three or less of the following characteristics defines someone as “different.”

The six characteristics of difference were race/ethnicity, socioeconomic class, club activity, sexual orientation, class year and varsity sport. According to some of the survey results, 94 percent of students/respondents believe varsity sports is a frequent reason/characteristic that other students form groups, 80 percent of students/respondents believe class year is a frequent reason/characteristic that other students form groups and 73 percent of students/respondents believe race/ethnicity is a frequent reason/characteristic that other students form groups.

After the panelists spoke, much of the discussion centered on Commons as a space where self-segregation is evident, noting instances where students of the same race, class year or sports team tend to exclusively sit together. As Williams explains, in addition to fostering more conversation at Bates and beyond, “a wonderful result of these forums would be if organic solutions—when appropriate—about topics we discuss emerge.”

Commons was a predominant concern raised by many forum participants; therefore Williams sees an opportunity for “students themselves [to] create, employ, and own” a way of breaking barriers in the dining hall.

Wright hopes the conversation continues outside of these forums, in the dorms, in Commons and in their classes. “We need students to engage with each other in these types of environments because it makes us a better community and better citizens of this nation,” Wright said.

Darrius Campbell ’17 was a participant in Wednesday’s forum and questioned the sincerity of the Bates community in upholding the college’s values.

“I believe that Bates takes pride in values that simply do not exist,” Campbell said in a follow-up email. He pointed out examples of when those values are contradicted, particularly instances of exclusivity in Commons and the generalization that all Bates students are nice – even though discriminatory slurs have been directed at Campbell himself.

“I just want the administration to see that the Bates they try to promote with commendable and respectable values is actually struggling to accept that everyone is equal and no one is better than anyone, because even through different trials, we are all here and getting the same education… a Bates education,” Campbell said.

“Lingua Franca” means a language adopted as common between speakers whose native tongues differ. In that spirit, Lingua Franca is an opportunity to discuss issues in a respectful environment, as well as move into other spaces and platforms for discussion to implement solutions. More forums are expected for the coming academic year.

Mozz sticks: a right, not a privilege

Fully renovated as of May 2013, the Bobcat Den was designed as an “an alternative dining space” to Commons, according to Bates Dining Services. Since then, it has come to serve the needs of students craving anything other than Commons on both weekdays and weekends, and is equipped with a weeknight-ly delivery service. Moreover, the Den is open when Commons is closed, and regularly provides sushi, sandwhiches, burgers, and other food that Commons does not offer every single day. This highly frequented, highly needed, alternative space, however, is not included in the Commons meal plan, which I believe to be a discriminatory principle that has concerning implications.

The Den provides a space of solitude and privacy, with a lack of social pressure to commune with the other people enjoying their meals. The Den is arranged circularly, with boothed tables lining its perimeter, and tables connected with a specific amount of chairs at its center. There are three differences in layout to the Den’s nucleus. The tables closest to the register are elevated and stand above any other seating option, creating a vertical barrier. The next level of the circle has tables of the same height as every other seating option, that are connected, but can be taken apart. These tables are most similar to those of Commons, in that they are in open space with no architectural boundaries between them and the other tables. The last layer at the heart of this setup are comfy leather couches and single-person chairs. While they are out in the open like the tables with traditional chairs, they do not have large tables, and afford the comfort of spatial separation between each couch. Lastly, there are booths on the perimeter of the Den, with tall backed walls, a physical indication denoting privacy and separation from other booths and tables. The contrast of the physical layout to Commons, without even comparing the pillars, is intensely stark. Without going into much detail about the Den’s hours and busiest times or noting its delivery service and just remembering the simple architectural difference it has to Commons is enough to understand the contrasting vibes between the Den and Commons, and why the Den is such a necessary option for Bates Students to have.

Unlike the Den, Commons is not designed for introverts. Its large tables marked with a specific number of chairs suggest a large party fill them, and there is no physical privacy from one table to the next. In addition, because Commons gets so busy during lunch and dinner times, occupying one table individually excludes others from finding a table conveniently located close to the food stations. The tables upstairs are not any more private than  those downstairs, nor is the Fishbowl. The Green Room is the only place in which physical boundaries of privacy are demarcated by smaller tables and benches, yet it is one of the smallest parts of Commons, and its original purpose was not included to be a part of Commons. While having a singular dining commons is a hallmark not only of the Bates tradition, but also the Bates experience, it places a lot of social pressure on students to constantly engage with one another. The Den provides a haven of rest and recuperation for those who want to enjoy a meal in silence, to eat while catching up on homework, or to simply take their meal to go, which is prohibited by Commons. By requiring money from students instead of being a part of the meal plan, students are forced to place a monetary value on their privacy. Furthermore, privacy and alone time, as a part of meal time, are now commodified privileges that is only available to the students who can afford it, which is inherently problematic. If students want to eat enjoy their meals in silence or by themselves, they literally have to pay for it.

For this reason, it makes sense to include the Den in the Commons meal plan by either raising the meal plan price, or generating a point system that would work in the following ways: if a student only swipes into Commons one or two times, rather than three or more times a day, they are alotted a certain amount to spend at the Den as a part of their meal plan. This would also benefit students who have dietary restrictions and have trouble finding what they need in Commons because of these restrictions. This would also remove pressure from Commons to satisfy every single need of every individual student, which can not only be overwhelming, but is also a farfetched idea.

Fully renovated as of May 2013, the Bobcat Den was designed as an “an alternative dining space” to Commons, according to Bates Dining Services. Since then, it has come to serve the needs of students craving anything other than Commons on both weekdays and weekends, and is equipped with a weeknight-ly delivery service. Moreover, the Den is open when Commons is closed, and regularly provides sushi, sandwhiches, burgers, and other food that Commons does not offer every single day. This highly frequented, highly needed, alternative space, however, is not included in the Commons meal plan, which I believe to be a discriminatory principle that has concerning implications.

The Den provides a space of solitude and privacy, with a lack of social pressure to commune with the other people enjoying their meals. The Den is arranged circularly, with boothed tables lining its perimeter, and tables connected with a specific amount of chairs at its center. There are three differences in layout to the Den’s nucleus. The tables closest to the register are elevated and stand above any other seating option, creating a vertical barrier. The next level of the circle has tables of the same height as every other seating option, that are connected, but can be taken apart. These tables are most similar to those of Commons, in that they are in open space with no architectural boundaries between them and the other tables. The last layer at the heart of this setup are comfy leather couches and single-person chairs. While they are out in the open like the tables with traditional chairs, they do not have large tables, and afford the comfort of spatial separation between each couch. Lastly, there are booths on the perimeter of the Den, with tall backed walls, a physical indication denoting privacy and separation from other booths and tables. The contrast of the physical layout to Commons, without even comparing the pillars, is intensely stark. Without going into much detail about the Den’s hours and busiest times or noting its delivery service and just remembering the simple architectural difference it has to Commons is enough to understand the contrasting vibes between the Den and Commons, and why the Den is such a necessary option for Bates Students to have.

Unlike the Den, Commons is not designed for introverts. Its large tables marked with a specific number of chairs suggest a large party fill them, and there is no physical privacy from one table to the next. In addition, because Commons gets so busy during lunch and dinner times, occupying one table individually excludes others from finding a table conveniently located close to the food stations. The tables upstairs are not any more private than  those downstairs, nor is the Fishbowl. The Green Room is the only place in which physical boundaries of privacy are demarcated by smaller tables and benches, yet it is one of the smallest parts of Commons, and its original purpose was not included to be a part of Commons. While having a singular dining commons is a hallmark not only of the Bates tradition, but also the Bates experience, it places a lot of social pressure on students to constantly engage with one another. The Den provides a haven of rest and recuperation for those who want to enjoy a meal in silence, to eat while catching up on homework, or to simply take their meal to go, which is prohibited by Commons. By requiring money from students instead of being a part of the meal plan, students are forced to place a monetary value on their privacy. Furthermore, privacy and alone time, as a part of meal time, are now commodified privileges that is only available to the students who can afford it, which is inherently problematic. If students want to eat enjoy their meals in silence or by themselves, they literally have to pay for it.

For this reason, it makes sense to include the Den in the Commons meal plan by either raising the meal plan price, or generating a point system that would work in the following ways: if a student only swipes into Commons one or two times, rather than three or more times a day, they are alotted a certain amount to spend at the Den as a part of their meal plan. This would also benefit students who have dietary restrictions and have trouble finding what they need in Commons because of these restrictions. This would also remove pressure from Commons to satisfy every single need of every individual student, which can not only be overwhelming, but is also a farfetched idea.

Volleyball advances to NESCAC tournament

Earlier this year on October 16, the Bates women’s volleyball team beat Hamilton 3-2, earning their third NESCAC victory of the season. They didn’t know it then, but that victory would be enough to secure them a position in the NESCAC tournament for the first time since 2008.

Despite losing their final two conference tilts against Middlebury and Bowdoin over the past two weeks, the Bobcats were the benefactors of Hamilton, Trinity and Wesleyan all losing their final two conference matches as well. This left Bates in sole possession of eighth place in the conference standings, and earned them a spot in the NESCAC conference tournament.

Since its formal inception in 1999, the NESCAC has organized postseason tournaments for the majority of its competitive sports, volleyball included. This is the eighth time Bates has qualified for the postseason tournament. Bates has never won the conference championship, although they came close during a six-year stretch from 1999-2004. During those first six years of the conference tournament, Bates qualified every year, losing in the championship game in 1999, 2000 and 2003. It was also during this successful series of years in which Bates posted two school records; an NCAA Sweet Sixteen finish in 2000, and nine conference wins in 2003. 2008 was the last time Bates qualified for the tournament, also as the eighth seed, losing in the first round to first-seeded Tufts, 3-1.

Bates will play Bowdoin this Friday in the opening match of the tournament, their third match-up of the season. Bates lost to Bowdoin earlier this fall in the Midcoast Classic tournament 3-0, and dropped their final conference matchup against the Polar Bears 3-1 at home over Halloween weekend.

“We know what to expect from Bowdoin, there is a familiarity with them at this point that is a huge benefit for us,” said first-year head coach Melissa DeRan, who is tasked with preparing her team this week for every players’ first collegiate postseason experience.

“The fact is no one outside of our program expects us to beat Bowdoin,” DeRan said. “And not having to deal with all that pressure actually gives us the freedom to play a lot more loose while still being aggressive.”

As the top seed on the strength of their 9-1 regular season record in the NESCAC, Bowdoin is awarded home court advantage for the duration of the conference tournament. No eighth-seeded team has ever upset the first seed in the NESCAC volleyball tournament. This matchup has only gone to five sets once, when Wesleyan held off Middlebury in 2001. Yet DeRan is still confident in her teams ability.

“Bowdoin is a very strong team at every position,” DeRan commented. “What gives us an advantage is not any weakness in their game but the fact that we have yet to reach our own potential. If everyone [is] at 100%, I really like our chances to pull off an upset.”

“We have had a wonderful intensity for the past few weeks of practice and I expect that to continue,” DeRan continued. “None of us are ready for our season to be over. Our entire team is going to be pushing each other as hard as possible, and I have no doubt we will be ready for another shot at Bowdoin on Friday.”

Men’s soccer season comes to an end with tie at Colby

For the Bobcat men’s soccer team, a win would have guaranteed them a trip to the NESCAC playoffs. On a rainy night where the conditions were difficult at times, Bates and Colby went the distance. Ultimately, the ‘Cats were unable to put the ball in the back of the net, and their final game of the season ended in a disappointing 0-0 tie.

Senior goalkeeper Sam Polito, who was solid all year and finished his collegiate career on a high note, recording four saves and stymied all the Mules’ chances on net. The Bates’ defense was solid all night as well, with senior Noah Riskind leading the effort.

Offensively, while the Bobcats did not record many chances, they did put a few good balls on net. Their best chance came in the first half of Overtime, when freshman forward Ben Lyons put a shot on net that went just above the cross bar. Fellow seniors Sean Moyo andLuis Pereira, perfect examples of toughness that the team exhibited all year, were vocal throughout the contest, and provided good chances for their fellow running mates in their last collegiate contest.

The tie marked an end of a season where the Bobcats had some of their best results in recent memory. Finishing 7-5-2, the team provided spectators a glimpse into a bright future, with a combined ten freshmen and sophomores seeing meaningful action. Coupled with an impressive rising senior class, the sky is the limit for the men’s soccer team heading into the 2016 season.

 

Sprained Ankle: Overcoming inner demons

Julien Baker is one of us. She’s a student at Middle Tennessee State University and though she’s not old enough to legally drink, she’s seen more darkness and fright then most people face before they die. Sprained Ankle is the result of icy isolation, a life adrift in limbo, away from beloved friends and purpose.

The title track of the album is a wonderful and slow-burning affair. There are no drums, the track being tugged along by two delicately plucked heartbeats: one steely and tiptoed, the other warm and lingering. As the song progresses, layers fall into place and a mosaic wonder comes to creation. Reverb echoes about like organ in a church hall, Baker’s own ghostly vocals haunt along the background, more guitar patterns mingle in and swelling bits of string orchestration fill every sonic space. The majesty is in the music, but the pain and power is tucked between gentle breaths. The verses contain the sting of a life already over, youth having been choked out by depression. The metaphor of “Sprained Ankle” is contained in the very last lines of lyric, “Marathon runner, my ankles are sprained.” Life is long enough to hurt and tough enough to break even the best of us, but Baker (and many of us) must race along with the extra burden of a heavy heart, so that each step is pained no matter the pace. The distant hope is that we’ll all triumphantly finish sooner or later, intact or in pieces.

The rest of the subject matter mentioned within the album is vast and dark, filled with early morning intrusive thoughts and moments of mental unsettle: loneliness, the fear that comes with weakness and physical frailty, the lasting ruin of substance abuse and addiction, the questioning of a once-sound faith. The record is undeniably sad, each song shivering little bits of your skull, piece by piece, one verse at a time. Most of the time, daggers are slipped through whispers; the most powerful moments are when Baker enters trances of roaring emo intensity like in “Rejoice” and “Something.” Even so her shouts are melodic, pretty even. The record never stops being beautiful.

The aforementioned “Something” is another standout. It is the longest song and details the inevitable and slow tear of two people once inseparable. The song is driven by hollow and distant guitars reminiscent of Explosions In The Sky. Baker’s vocals are especially cavernous in this track, mimicking the stubborn and lingering bits of memory. Here we see Baker at her most intense, this song providing the most raw and emotional vocals on the album.

The last song ends in static, mysterious interference from an evangelical radio station. A preacher is shouting, triumphantly and zealously, with all the glory he can muster. And though the half hour before was somber, the last few seconds are golden and hopeful. Doubts and demons are washed away and we know that as the distant voice fades out to nothing, we’ll be okay.

In the end, the album is not about being sad or being hurt. It’s about overcoming those handicaps. Beneath the icy bite of anguish, below the loneliness and sickening sad, there is faith. Not in a happy ending, but in inner strength, that will to go on and live.

Missing the point

In the middle of September, a staff writer for The Wesleyan Argus, Bryan Stascavage, wrote an article titled “Why Black Lives Matter Isn’t What You Think.” In the article, Stascavage argues that Black Lives Matter has over-generalized police as killers. He refers to the movement as “hypocritical” due to the recent killings, some execution style, of police officers. It garnered a lot of attention, and the students were not quiet about their opinions, resulting in the paper’s funding being cut.

Wesleyan’s president, Michael Roth, addressed the responses through his online blog, Roth on Campus. President Roth wrote, “Some students not only have expressed their disagreement with the op-ed but have demanded apologies, a retraction and have even harassed the author and the newspaper’s editor.” President Roth went on to defend freedom of speech by writing, “Debates can raise intense emotions, but that doesn’t mean that we should demand ideological conformity because people are made uncomfortable…. Censorship diminishes true diversity of thinking; vigorous debate enlivens and instructs.”

Yet, despite President Roth coming out in defense of freedom of speech and expression, the newspaper’s budget was cut. The Hartford Courant reported that the student government cut The Wesleyan Argus’s budget $17,000. The funding went from $30,000 to $13,000, a decrease of over 50 percent.

Technically this budgetary cut is not directly restricting the student body’s freedom of speech or expression. In fact, the article can still be read on the newspaper’s website. However, such a severe budgetary cut sends a very clear message from the student governing body to The Wesleyan Argus, as well as the student body as a whole. It is basically telling the writers and editors, and anyone who wants to voice their opinion, that their thoughts better not differ from the majority’s. As President Roth’s response alludes to, this type of response misses the point.

In terms of the article itself, I disagree. According to Stascavage’s wesconnect page, he served in the US Army from August 2006 to March 2012. As a veteran, he may have a very different perspective on BLM than most people. With that being said, I think that Stascavage does not understand the BLM movement. He talks repeatedly about how BLM has founded its movement in protesting the actions of the few extreme cops. However, the nearly daily reports of police brutality against people of color show that extreme police actions are anything but the exception. In a society where countless police have gunned down, tasered, and choked innocent people of color, then walked away with little if any repercussion, it is difficult to argue that police brutality is the action of a small minority. Not every police officer is racist, and the majority probably isn’t, but clearly America has an institutionalized problem.

Coming full circle, both Stascavage and Wesleyan’s student government have missed the point. Stascavage missed the motivation behind, and importance, of BLM. The student government has obstructed freedom of expression and speech, potentially preventing future meaningful debate and discussion that could have shown Stascavage the errors in his thought process.

Women’s cross-country team fifth, men seventh at NESCAC championship

Senior captain Allen Sumrall led the pack of Bates runners at NESCACs.                 (PHYLLIS GRABER JENSEN/BATES COLLEGE)

Senior captain Allen Sumrall led the pack of Bates runners at NESCACs. (PHYLLIS GRABER JENSEN/BATES COLLEGE)

Bates cross-country performed well at the NESCAC Championships this past Saturday in Middletown, Connecticut, kicking off championship season in good form ahead of the ECAC, Regional, and NCAA races.

The number 19 nationally ranked Bates men, led by senior captain Allen Sumrall, placed seventh overall out of 11 NESCAC teams. As a team, Bates notched 184 points, directly ahead of rivals Colby and Bowdoin. The members of the team that recorded points included Sumrall, junior Joe Doyle in 41st, senior Gregg Heller (44th), junior Evan Ferguson-Hull (47th), and sophomore Matt Morris (48th).

Sumrall, who ran the eight-kilometer course in 25:24.45, earned Second Team All-NESCAC honors for his outstanding performance, his first-ever NESCAC All-Conference award.

The Bates women tallied 139 team points, directly behind fourth-place Amherst and comfortably ahead of sixth-place Connecticut College. Five runners scored points for Bates, including junior Jess Wilson (17th), senior Isabelle Unger (23rd), sophomore Katherine Cook (25th), junior Molly Chisholm (34th), and first-year Sarah Rothmann (52nd).

By coming in fifth place, the Bates women secured their best conference result since 2013 and their fourth straight top-six NESCAC championship meet finish. Along with their male counterparts, they’ll aim to build on their strong showing this Saturday at the ECAC Championships in Williamstown, Massachusetts.

A night filled with talented singers and Halloween vibes

ManOps perform with their usual antics. SARAH CROSBY/COURTESY PHOTO

As Halloween was turning the corner, three amazing a capella groups decided to put on a show for the student body to get them excited for the weekend. Crosstones, Deansmen and Take Note put on a theatrically entertaining show filled with great talent and Halloween spirit.

Each a capella group decided to make a set list that included pop music as well as Halloween classics. This concert took place in the Benjamin Mays Center and was filled with hyped energy and comical dance moves. The singers dressed up in creative costumes and threw candy at the audience in spirit of the holiday.

Katrina Muñoz ’18 stated, “There was a lot more acting, which made it more engaging and entertaining.” Not only were the groups singing, but they all got into full character for their performance.

Sophie Gardephe ’18, who is a member of the Crosstones, exclaims “We wanted to sing songs that were upbeat and fun, but we also wanted to sing songs that played off the theme of Halloween.” Through this deliberative decision, they did a great job with their song choices. “We chose ‘Mercy,’ ‘Black and Gold/Sun of a Gun’ and ‘Monster Mash,’ she said.

“Monster Mash” was a huge success – not only according to Gardephe but to Muñoz, an excited audience member. “Crosstones performed ‘Monster Mash.’ The lead singer was a freshman and his voice was spot on. He sounded like a vampire!”

When speaking to Gardephe, she was very proud of her group for performing “Monster Mash.” “We arranged it ourselves because it is such a fun Halloween song and we felt it would be a perfect addition to our set list! Our first year soloist, Michael Somkuti, did a fabulous job with the song!”

The ManOps also did a great job impressing the audience with their rendition of “Ghostbusters.” As Maddie Lachevre ’18 put it, “They were definitely my favorite from last night. Lead singer Calvin Hollingsworth-Coffin was the soloist for Ghostbusters and did an excellent job. They even threw candy during the song!”

This concert created by the ManOps ended up being a great success. It got everyone very excited for the rest of Halloween’s festivities. The energy of students walking out of the Mays Center after the performance was enthusiastic and mesmerized with how amazing and talented our a capella groups are.

These groups never seem to stop impressing us with their talent and creativity that represents just a portion of the talent found at Bates College.

How well-rounded are the Bates requirements?

Why is it that a humanities major at Bates College is forced to take a science class, quantitative class, and lab in order to graduate? Bates College undoubtedly wants to produce well-rounded individuals who have received a full liberal arts education. Yet, what astonishes me, is that a sciences major at Bates College can go their entire four years without taking a single humanities or arts course. How well-rounded will these individuals be when they graduate? They will have had an impressive education in whatever field they choose to go into, but they will not have taken any religion, sociology, women and gender studies, history or literature courses (to name a few) – all subjects that are beginning to be acknowledged as increasingly important fields of study when it comes to understanding and working with people.

The core humanities courses are not the only areas that are being ignored when it comes to the school’s academic requirements: the arts are being shoved away as useless to the Bates student as well. Bates College cannot produce well-rounded students if they are not requiring them to take classes in dance, theater, music, and art. Taking a language class is also not a requirement. How is this school supposed to be viewed as diverse and open to different points of view when other cultures and languages are not being acknowledged as important? What baffles me is the message Bates is sending to the majors of these subjects. As I look at the different chemistry labs available I wonder first if Bates is attempting to torture me. By institutional standards, am I stupid if I do not take science courses? Am I not expected to get a job by being a religious studies major? If so, many people can blow off the humanities and arts; why can’t I forgo a class whose subject often gives me anxiety and low self-esteem? If I’m being forced to take three courses that I would not necessarily enjoy, why isn’t everyone else being told to do that as well?

I agree that it is important for each student at Bates College to receive a good education that includes classes that may not be up their alley. But, as someone who is very direct in their interests and knowledgeable about what they want, I do not think that forcing three different science/math courses (one of which is incredibly time consuming) is a fair approach to the need for well-rounded students.

Furthermore, as a school that is not exempt from issues of diversity and sexism, we should not be pushing the humanities into the corner of our academic agenda. It is important that each Bates student gets exposed to studies on gender, race, religion, and other subjects and issues that our world faces today. There has been talk about a diversity requirement at Bates, and I wholeheartedly agree with this idea; I believe it would change the way Bates is perceived by the outside world, as well as creating the well rounded students that Bates hopes to produce.

Page 1 of 2

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén